Monthly Archives: January 2018

Big Data Disaster Recovery Preparation Tips

Preparing to recover Big Data workloads after an unexpected disaster requires more than just having data backups on hand. This article explains how to build an effective Big Data disaster recovery strategy.

Disaster recovery is the process of restoring normal operations after an unexpected event destroys part or all of your IT infrastructure.

All organizations should have a disaster recovery plan in place. However, the importance of disaster recovery is even greater for companies that rely heavily on data to drive their business, and that need to restore data-based operations quickly in order to get back to business following a disaster.

5 Must-Haves for Big Data Disaster Recovery

An effective Big Data disaster recovery plan includes the following…

1. Off-Site Data Backups

Backing up your data to a remote location is the most obvious disaster recovery preparation step. Off-site backups ensure that data will remain unharmed in the event that a physical disaster, such as a fire or a major storm, destroys your production infrastructure.

Perhaps the most important item to keep in mind about off-site data backups is that they are not enough on their own to ensure reliable disaster recovery. See also: Data Backup vs. Disaster Recovery: Yes, There’s a Big Difference

usb 932180 960 720 600x Big Data Disaster Recovery Preparation Tips

2. On-Site Backups

Off-site data backups are the best way to ensure that data will remain available, no matter what type of disaster may strike.

In some cases, however, it may make sense also to keep on-site backups. The advantage of on-site data backups is that data can often be restored more quickly from on-site servers than it can from remote sites – provided, of course, that some of your on-site infrastructure survives the disaster.

3. Big Data Recovery Playbooks

When you’re dealing with an unexpected infrastructure failure, you need a plan in place for guiding all of your actions as you restore data. The last thing you should be doing is figuring things out as you go, or guessing what your next step should be.

This is why developing “playbooks” is so important. A playbook is a set of steps that you write out ahead of time – that is, before a disaster occurs – and follow when recovering from a disaster.

blog banner SoR 2018 1 Big Data Disaster Recovery Preparation Tips

Your playbooks should be written to be somewhat adaptable, of course, because it’s impossible to predict every challenge you’ll face during disaster recovery. But having playbooks in place will do much to lay the groundwork for quick and efficient disaster recovery.

4. Data Transformation Tools

Moving data from backup locations to production servers can be time-consuming when there is a lot of data involved. It is even more difficult if the data needs to undergo transformations – which is likely the case if, for example, your backup data is stored in one format but needs to be converted to a different format in production.

For this reason, it’s important to ensure that you’ll have good data transformation tools at your disposal during disaster recovery. This may require having backup instances of the tools available in case your production environments are destroyed.

5. Data Capture Continuity

A disaster may destroy your ability to continue capturing data, but it doesn’t stop the data from flowing. During disaster recovery, it’s important to ensure that you maintain continuous capture of data to the extent possible, even if your analytics operations are interrupted.

If possible, have backup storage locations that will become operable in the event that your main storage servers are disrupted. Ensure that your backup locations have enough capacity to handle the amount of new data that will be generated during the time it takes to restore operations – which could be hours, days or longer, depending on the type of disruption you suffer and the extent of your infrastructure.

Conclusion

Heeding the considerations discussed above will ensure not just that you have backup data available in the event that disaster strikes, but also that you can restore production data operations as quickly as possible. Backup data on its own is of little value if you can’t put it to use quickly in a broader Big Data disaster recovery strategy.

Download our 2018 State of Resilience Report to see how organizations are strategizing to sustain severe shocks, protect information, and enable the insight and intelligence required to stay competitive.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Syncsort + Trillium Software Blog

The Top 20 CRM Blogs of 2017: Countdown, Part 2

Where does the discipline of CRM begin? We have a good idea where the software fits, but where does its impact end? With a sale? With a customer saying good things about your company to other customers? With a repeat purchase? And does CRM contribute to these events alone, or is there a web of other activities that help drive these relationships — and do we ever consider these things to be CRM?

The world is becoming a much more complicated place for practitioners of CRM, expressly because of considerations like these. CRM itself is well understood; getting the most value from it is not understood nearly as well.

The top 10 CRM bloggers of 2017 didn’t spend a lot of time talking about the nuts and bolts of CRM. They talked about the concepts, assumptions, errors, omissions and expectations around CRM. They attacked the “common knowledge.” They tried to get to the basics of what customers really want.

The ground rules again: blogs must not be from a vendor, and they must have seven or more posts in a year. Here are the Top 10 of 2017:

10. Bob Thompson, Customer Think

With a hard pivot toward customer experience and loyalty, Bob Thompson has shifted his area of specialization in
Customer Think over the years as the industry has matured and specialized in its view of CRM.

Bob spent much of 2017 hammering on the idea that humans were critical to delivering the experiences customers wanted, pushing back on a technology tide that had people excited about bots, AI, IVR and other innovations.

While integration has been proceeding more smoothly with these technologies than with technologies of previous generations, it still takes a human touch to deliver the best experiences. It’s not “either-or,” it’s both, according to Bob.

Toward that end, he spent the first half of 2017 writing about tools and business practices for building better customer engagement, but anchored that discussion in how they helped customers — and how engaged, empowered and empathetic employees were key to making any of them work most effectively.

His blogs stopped in August — here’s hoping that Bob comes back to the blog this year and keeps advocating for a customer experience future that uses technology to keep a human face on customer relationships.

Posts in 2017: 15

Favorite post:
Here’s Proof from Forrester that CX Drives Revenue. And 3 Cautions That It May Not</a>

9. CRM Switch

Continuing a strong run is
CRM Switch, from a CRM consultancy that recognizes that a blog exists to start conversations, not to close deals.

The content — usually from Steve Chipman, but with important contributions from Daryn Reif as well — addresses all aspects of sales relationship thinking, with some more technology-focused items sprinkled in to ensure that the “how” is covered as well as the “why.”

Sometimes, the reporting can get a little lazy, as in “Small Business CRM Vendor Roundup,” which rounds up exactly five vendors, but those posts are the exception, not the rule.

More typical is “CRM Selection for Your Business: Seven Proven Steps,” which offers a detailed, comprehensive set of advice that anyone planning to buy and deploy CRM should take to heart.

Born of years of practical experience, CRM Switch’s blog is a helpful guide for any company pondering a jump to an automated CRM solution.

Total posts in 2017: 21

Favorite post:
CRM Lead: How do I Disqualify Thee? Let Me Count the Ways

8: Effective CRM – Mike Boysen

Y’know the old saw about people not wanting to buy a quarter-inch drill, they want to buy a quarter-inch hole? Mike Boysen does. Nearly all of last year’s
Effective CRM
posts went right at that concept: People want outcomes and they’re not that interested in how they get them, so companies need to engage customers about what they really want.

It’s an elemental concept in making a company “customer-centric,” yet a lot of businesses still don’t get it. Mike digs into how you realize what jobs need to be done, how you understand the moments of truth in customer relationships better with jobs theory, and how you can keep a clear focus on jobs that need doing vs. the other elements of a customer relationship that can distract and divert you.

Mike talks about this in blunt terms — I especially liked his quote, “There are no soft-landings for founders who think they are just failing fast. There is only failure.”

Mike addresses some tough issues about CRM itself: “Vendors have given us a one-size-fits-all option where we can feel that we’re differentiating ourselves with the same tools as our competitors. Let’s face it, the vendors out there are doing no better at finding growth  —  profitable growth —  than the rest of us.”

If you think CRM needs some tough love — and to get focused on what it should have been focused on all along — Mike’s the guy for you.

Total posts in 2017: 8

Favorite post:
You Need to Know this New, Pioneering Approach to CRM

7. Forrester Blog – Kate Leggett, John Bruno

Forrester collects all of its analyst blogs into one enormous mega-blog, but if your focus is primarily on CRM and the CRM-like technologies that serve sales, do a search and isolate the blogs from Kate Leggett and John Bruno.

Kate covers the more traditional CRM space and customer service, while John examines sales and marketing technologies. Together, they create a set of posts that are concise and correlate strongly to their current research, with a few “bigger picture” posts that explore broader topics, especially the current pressing issues like AI and digital transformation.

Last year, the blogs’ coverage seemed to pull back a little. At analyst firms, there’s a constant pressure between feeding the blog and keeping some information back for the customers, and the 2017 posts felt a bit like the pendulum had swung away from the blog.

That said, there was still a lot of value in what Kate and John wrote in 2017, and Kate was especially effective in connecting the dots between the technology and the need for engaged employees to use that technology to achieve customer engagement. That’s advice that companies get constantly, but coming from an authoritative voice like Kate’s can make it stick.

Posts in 2017: 16

Favorite post:
Intelligence Makes Customer Service Operations Smarter, More Strategic

6. Destination CRM Blog

Destination CRM is a classic “reporter’s notebook”-style blog, and having been a reporter, I find it very entertaining. Today’s journalists are on the job constantly, and that usually means coming across more interesting ideas and stories than you can fit into your many regularly scheduled articles.

Thus, Oren Smilansky and San Del Rowe provide a home for items about research studies, standalone Q&As, and interesting (if not front-page) company news, ranging in tone from analysis of hard data to the whimsical (as in the post above about the perils of being a customer service agent).

The posts are short, the pace is regular, and the writers follow the practice of including links to their sources — something I wish more bloggers would do.

Don’t let the “Department of the Obvious” headlines (“Customer-Initiated Phone Calls are Valuable to Marketers, Study Says,” “Companies Need to Address Customers in their Native Tongue”) put you off. The writing is good even when the headlines are meh.

At the blog’s best, the writers report on some new findings, and then riff off those results based on their own reporting experience, showing that journalists have some CRM expertise to offer, too.

Posts in 2017: 59

Favorite post:
Customer Cursing Habits, Broken Down by Region and Industry

5. Think Customers: the 1-to-1 Media Blog

Late last year,
Think Customers: the 1-to-1 Media Blog announced that it was going to cease publishing regularly, as its ad-supported model was phased out.

Although the frequency of posts dropped, the guest posts from notable experts dried up, and the staff of writers dwindled to two — veteran Judith Aquino and newcomer Dylan Haviland — the quality remained.

The blog featured some good interviews with genuine thought leaders like Charlene Li, along with other posts that read much more like news stories than like opinion pieces.

A typical approach was to use something discussed at a conference or some recently-released research as a springboard, then add to it with the opinions of analysts, experts and practitioners.

The bloggers’ voices may not always be front and center, but the posts themselves have an air of authority and a completeness of ideas that set them apart.

The blog’s focus on customer experience permits lots of latitude in what’s discussed: concepts like employee engagement in retail, the role of AI in contact centers, and the importance of trust are front and center.

The blog’s takes on these topics are never the same twice, an accomplishment that owes a lot to the hard work the two writers put into the blog.

Posts in 2017: 11

Favorite post:
Emotion Powers Technology Adoption

4. ThinkJar! The Blog – Esteban Kolsky

Always an iconoclast, Esteban Kolsky spent a lot of time in 2017 shutting down the hype about artificial intelligence — and then explaining how it could be really useful. If that sounds like two ideas running headlong into each other, you have an idea of Esteban’s usual take on any subject.

In
ThinkJar! The Blog, he tears ideas down and then rebuilds them in an Esteban-esque image, infusing the discussion with new points of view and better ways of thinking about the concepts.

As for AI, Esteban pointed out that the notion that AI will be smarter than humans is nonsensical, because “computers would have to dumb down their behavior and operations to work like us.”

Even if they did manage to replicate us, we humans have the ability to adapt our behaviors, something that AI can’t do, enabling us to find meaning and practical utility regardless of what AI does — a bit of a lesson to people who think that all sales and marketing activities can be supplanted by sufficiently smart machines.

Esteban also maintains his role as analyst — witness his incisive, ruthless but ultimately hopeful examination of the Jive-Lithium merger, chock-full of his not-so-humble advice. Smart and snarky, Esteban is the inventor of the concept of self-deprecating arrogance, and his blog is as fun to read as it is important.

Posts in 2017: 16

Favorite post:
Knowledge Summary: the Next Decade in Digital Transformation

3. CRM Search

So, if you’re a medium-sized company looking for CRM advice, you could call in a high-priced consultant, engage with one of the large analyst firms, or find multiple other methods by which you could expend a lot of money in search of wisdom.

Before you start writing checks, however, you should check out the blog at
CRM Search, written by the widely-admired Chuck Schaeffer.

His posts are as detailed and thorough as many of the analyst’s reports you’d pay big money for, and they come from a genuine place of expertise.

Don’t expect a bunch of quick takes — it’s not uncommon for a post to go on for 1,100 words, and then jump to the next page for more. Replete with charts, graphics and plenty of linked citations, these are not pieces jotted off the top of Chuck’s head during airplane flights — they’re extremely thoughtful and well-planned posts.

Whether he’s reviewing the latest edition of Microsoft Dynamics 365, or defining and explaining the ramifications of cognitive computing, it’s Chuck’s deep dives into some heavy-duty subjects that make his blog essential.

The topics can seem a bit all over the place, and they are; it seems that Chuck writes about the things that most interest him in the moment. That ensures the posts are thorough, complete and energetic even when they examine deep, technical topics.

Posts in 2017: 8

Favorite post:
How to Design Your 360-Degree Customer View

2. Beagle Research Blog – Denis Pombriant

What were you concerned about in 2017? So concerned that you sat down and wrote about it? If you said the ASC 606 Accounting Rule, Richard Branson, AI and CRM, Oracle OpenWorld and Salesforce’s DreamForce, cryptocurrency, how Elon Musk is a Luddite and the best way to assemble a sales team based on the data, you must be Denis Pombriant.

Who else has such an eclectic view of the influences on customer relationships, sales and marketing, and digital transformation? No one who’s currently writing a blog!

Author of the
Beagle Research Blog and regular contributor to CRM Buyer, Denis has the ability to stitch these various stories together in a way that’s unmatched. While they may seem far afield from the topic of customer relationship management at times, they’re really not — Denis has for years avoided the trap of thinking that all there was to CRM was CRM software and vendors.

Everything in the economic system that affects the customer needs to be considered, whether it’s the coming impact of blockchain, the value of configure price quote (CPQ) tools to the buying experience, or how the availability of micropayment tools will change the equation for selling.

Denis does this in an exceptionally literate style and folds in plenty of metaphors and analogies to keep things from becoming stale or staid. On top of that, his analyses of major industry events goes beyond insightful. Several journalists I know say they check the blog to make sense of the events they’ve just attended.

Posts in 2017: 49

Favorite post:
Getting Loyalty Right

1. Social CRM: The Conversation – Paul Greenberg

I know the busy, busy Paul Greenberg would like to slow down. Don’t tell his brain that, though.

In 2017, he worked very hard to complete a new book (which will be out this summer), and you could see very clearly how Paul’s intent thinking about his latest long-form work impacted his shorter-form writing in
Social CRM: The Conversation. Ideas were sharper, metaphors were clearer, and Paul’s writing was even more energetic (if that’s possible).

It seems the more Paul works and the more he thinks, the more interesting things spill out into his writing. Last year, his investigations into the discipline of CRM focused much more on using the data than the process of collecting data, which has become an established practice and thus is less interesting.

“Doing CRM” is no longer about getting people to record the data; it’s focused on using the data to become the company you should be. Witness our favorite post of the year: Paul talks about how a company renowned for its abysmal treatment of customers was forced by a business downturn to engage with customers and seemingly was shocked by how well that tactic worked.

Paul’s point in this piece is not just that engaged customer relationships are good for business, but that businesses need to pursue them because they and the people they hire desire — no, need — to pursue them.

A corporate initiative to be more engaged because it will help sales is nice — but it can’t hold a candle to engagement that’s driven by culture and the genuine desire of employees to be engaged.

Paul also used guest posts to buy time for finishing his book, and he’s able to call in heavy hitters like Sameer Patel, David Raab and Brent Leary to fill in. But it’s Paul’s own unique voice that allowed his blog to reclaim the top of this list . His is one of the few blogs that can advise you of the things you should be doing differently and leave you genuinely excited about trying them.

Posts in 2017:14

Favorite post:
A Company Like Me: Beyond Customer-Centric to Customer-Engagedend enn The Top 20 CRM Blogs of 2017: Countdown, Part 2


Chris%20Bucholtz The Top 20 CRM Blogs of 2017: Countdown, Part 2Chris Bucholtz has been an ECT News Network columnist since 2009. His focus is on CRM, sales and marketing software, and the interface between people and technology. A noted speaker and author, Chris has covered the CRM space for 10 years.
Email Chris.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

CRM Buyer

ENDING YOUR DAY WITH A CHUCKLE

Advertisements

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

ANTZ-IN-PANTZ ……

Question on Global variables

 Question on Global variables

What are the maximum values for $ MaxLicenseProcesses and $ MaxLicenseSubprocesses? Can they be infinite or are there specific limitations? Does $ ProcessorCount depend on the license or on the machine?

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Recent Questions – Mathematica Stack Exchange

FICO Data: Warning Signs for New Card Accounts in Ireland

Card Delinquency UK Irish FICO FICO Data: Warning Signs for New Card Accounts in Ireland

Our analysis of UK and Ireland card trends in the FICO® Benchmark Reporting Service has revealed some worrying trends for cards issued in Ireland. Over the past few months, the percentage of new Irish card accounts that are delinquent has climbed to around 10%, more than twice the average for UK cards.

We see a similar trend with delinquent balances on new Irish cards, where 13.5% of balances were delinquent in December, compared with 3.5% for UK cards. New accounts are those on book less than a year.

This indicates a riskier population are being accepted in Ireland, and it is worth Irish issuers identifying the reasons for this, as changes to originations policies may be needed. The trend is reinforced by the recent sharp rise in average credit lines for new accounts in the Irish market, allowing potentially higher delinquent balances to flow through.

Average delinquency balances on all cards are more in line with the UK, despite credit limits being approximately 18% lower than the UK, and the more mature accounts are influencing this. For new accounts, though, average 2-cycle delinquent balances are more than 36% higher than in the UK.

Other Trends in Irish Cards vs. UK Cards

  • More accounts use cash in Ireland (12.4% vs. 6.2%) and the most noticeable difference is for new cards (27.7% vs. 12%). The proportion of cash sales to total sales is also higher, again more noticeably for new accounts, with average total sales (combination of cash and merchandise) higher in Ireland.
  • Not surprisingly, looking at the delinquency rates, a higher proportion of accounts are not paying the full amount due in Ireland. However, the highest proportion of accounts in both markets pays the full balance off each month.
  • There is a higher proportion of accounts with a direct debit in the UK. Lower rates in Ireland are influenced by accounts >1 year on book, so there are opportunities here to promote direct debit usage as well.
  • Average credit lines for accounts >1 year on book Ireland are lower than in the UK. This is influenced by the difference in the regulations, as limits can only be increased at the request of a cardholder in Ireland. However, average credit lines on new Irish accounts have moved noticeably above the UK average in July 2017 and have remained at this level since.

Given these trends, it is not surprising to see a higher overall percentage of overlimit accounts in Ireland. Despite the higher average lines for new accounts in Ireland vs. the UK, the percentage of overlimit accounts also exceeds the UK average. The average amount overlimit in Ireland for accounts <5 years on book is significantly higher than in the UK. Collections teams could review to determine if specific action is required on this subpopulation.

FICO’s Benchmarking Services

The card performance figures are part of the data shared with subscribers of the FICO® Benchmark Reporting Service, which compares overall market performance in the UK cards market with individual card issuers’ performance. The data sample comes from client reports generated by the FICO® TRIAD® Customer Manager solution in use by most UK and Irish card issuers. For more information on the new service, please contact me at staceywest@fico.com.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

FICO

French ride-sharing unicorn BlaBlaCar retools branding and services for its second decade

 French ride sharing unicorn BlaBlaCar retools branding and services for its second decade

As Paris-based BlaBlaCar heads into its awkward teenage years, the startup is unveiling a new look and features designed to expand its utility and appeal to a greater range of users.

This mini reboot includes a branding campaign and a new logo that swaps its colorful, whimsical look for a more mature, serious image. But perhaps more critically, the updates will include some fairly fundamental improvements to a service that now counts 60 million users worldwide.

“We have to bring more convenience to passengers,” said CEO Nicolas Brusson. “Before, we were seen as cheap and cheerful and social. We want to continue to carry that image of being social. But today, we want to be seen as more mainstream, and something that is even more convenient.”

BlaBlaCar gets its name from the idea of strangers getting into a car for random meetings and conversations. Today, it is one of Europe’s most closely watched startup stories.

Initially conceived way back in 2003, and launched in 2006, BlaBlaCar has raised $ 335 million in venture capital, including a $ 200 million round in 2015 that still stands as the French VC record and that saddled the company with a $ 1.5 billion valuation. In the striving French Tech scene, BlaBlaCar has become the poster child for the ecosystem’s ambitions, proof that France can produce startups that become global winners.

But last year, it seemed BlaBlaCar’s success hit some speed bumps. The company had been focused for several years on aggressive international expansion, which led to huge successes in places like Brazil and Russia, the latter of which is now the company’s largest and fastest-growing market. But expansion also included stumbles in places like India, Turkey, and Mexico, where the company closed its offices, leaving it with operations in 22 countries.

This setback raised questions about whether BlaBlaCar had run out of steam, and whether it could ever achieve some kind of exit that would justify its massive investment.

There still appears to be no timeline for an exit. However, in an interview, Brusson was more focused on how BlaBlaCar plans to evolve. He said the announcements today were more than just cosmetic changes, but rather a sign of how the company hopes to leverage what it has learned in its first decade.

That begins with how people use the service. Until now, people booked a ride by listing the city they were starting from and the city they were going to and the date of their trip. To make a match on BlaBlaCar, a driver had to be going from the same two cities on the same day. The passengers and drivers would agree on a meeting place, which could involve the passenger getting on a train or bus or the driver to going out of their way to pick them up.

Given the evolution of ride-hailing and ride-sharing, Brusson said expectations are very different now from what they were a decade ago. For one thing, people expect to be picked up where they live and dropped off where they want to go without having to make several additional connections.

Brusson said the technology underlying BlaBlaCar’s platform will shift over the coming months to make that possible.

More importantly, there is enough intelligence in the platform and a critical mass of users to allow BlaBlaCar to start matching drivers with passengers who are only going on one leg of a longer journey, Brusson said.

So, for instance, a driver going from Paris to Lyon can be alerted that there are potential passengers in towns along the route who need a ride and who could be picked up with just a short stop or detour. This improved search function will allow greater access to residents in secondary towns, where there might not be any BlaBlaCar drivers originating trips.

“It’s going to enable lots of new connections; it’s almost exponential,” he said. “Every location in any country where we operate becomes much more highly connected.”

Of course, it’s also a means of expanding BlaBlaCar’s presence in its current markets without having to go hunting for new territories, which in the past has required either big up-front investments or the acquisition of a local competitor.

It also hopefully lets BlaBlaCar keep pace in the fast-moving transportation sector.

When BlaBlaCar launched more than a decade ago, the notion of doing a transportation startup was rather exotic. Today, the future of transportation is one of tech’s hottest topics, with disruption and innovation rapidly accelerating. That doesn’t necessarily mean BlaBlaCar needs to pivot, but it does necessitate some changes to anticipate new developments, such as autonomous vehicles.

Still, Brusson said that even after a decade, transportation services like BlaBlaCar are still in the early stages in terms of tapping into the opportunity that exists.

“No one has cracked the Holy Grail of really shared mobility,” he said. “Today, 80 percent of mobility is served by cars. I wish I could say that most of them are on BlaBlaCar, but it’s not true. Today, what we’ve done is to some extent pretty primitive. When you start introducing more technology, you can multiply the matching and the numbers of trips dramatically.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Big Data – VentureBeat

5 astuces pour assurer un haut taux d’adoption des utilisateurs lors de l’implantation de votre nouvelle solution Microsoft Dynamics 365 – Avant l’implantation

CRM Blog 5 astuces pour assurer un haut taux d’adoption des utilisateurs lors de l’implantation de votre nouvelle solution Microsoft Dynamics 365 – Avant l’implantation

L’implantation d’une nouvelle solution CRM telle que Microsoft Dynamics 365 peut représenter un investissement substantiel pour toute organisation, autant en temps qu’en argent. Il importe donc que vos ressources utilisent le nouveau système afin que ses fonctionnalités et bénéfices permettent à votre organisation de profiter du meilleur rendement possible sur son investissement. À cette fin, plusieurs mesures peuvent être prises avant même le processus d’implantation pour assurer un haut taux d’adoption de la solution par les utilisateurs ainsi que des processus simplifiés et une productivité augmentée à long terme.

Cette série en trois parties offre des trucs et astuces pour augmenter le taux d’adoption de la solution au sein de votre organisation, lesquels peuvent s’appliquer tout au long du processus d’implantation, incluant avant et après l’installation. Voici donc 5 astuces pour vous aider à choisir la solution CRM qui répondra le mieux aux besoins de votre organisation et de vos utilisateurs finaux.

  1. Avant de commencer, sondez vos utilisateurs et identifiez les indices de performance clé que vous souhaitez améliorer. En ayant des critères spécifiques établis dès le départ, vous pourrez plus facilement juger si le projet d’implantation est une réussite. De nombreux éléments peuvent être mesurés : la satisfaction des utilisateurs, les coûts d’opération, la productivité, la collaboration, l’engagement des employés, etc.
  2. Faites appel à un consultant pour vous aider avec la gestion du changement. Bien qu’il puisse être tentant d’éviter les coûts additionnels qu’un consultant représente, vous économiserez à long terme en évitant les dépassements de budget et d’échéanciers. Un expert en gestion du changement peut aussi vous aider à mettre en place la structure nécessaire pour assurer que vos utilisateurs finaux reçoivent la formation appropriée.
  3. Travaillez avec votre partenaire d’implantation afin que la nouvelle solution suive vos processus existants et non l’inverse. Ceci facilitera la formation des utilisateurs et optimisera leur productivité et efficacité puisque votre nouvelle solution soutiendra la méthode de travail actuelle de votre personnel. Prenez soin de choisir une solution qui pourra croître avec vos affaires et soutenir les processus de votre organisation même dans 5, 10 ou 15 ans.
  4. Assurez-vous que vos utilisateurs comprennent pourquoi votre organisation implante une nouvelle solution CRM. Les utilisateurs finaux ne sont jamais bien heureux de voir leur routine quotidienne chamboulée et d’avoir à apprendre à naviguer et utiliser un nouveau système. Il est donc important qu’ils comprennent quels sont les objectifs de votre organisation et comment la solution aura un impact positif sur leur succès individuel ainsi que celui de l’organisation.
  5. Impliquez vos ressources dans le choix de la solution. Des démonstrations et des présentations peuvent faire en sorte que vos ressources se sentent impliquées dans le processus dès le début. Il y a plus de chances qu’elles voient le changement d’un bon œil si elles ont l’impression que leurs commentaires ont été pris en compte.

Ces astuces vous aideront à assurer que la transition vers la nouvelle solution se fait tout en douceur. En comprenant votre vision et comment le système pourra les aider à long terme, vos utilisateurs finaux seront plus ouverts au changement et à l’utilisation de la nouvelle solution. Pour plus d’informations, lisez notre article pour savoir Quoi prendre en considération avant de débuter l’implantation de Microsoft Dynamics CRM.

Par JOVACO Solutions, spécialiste de Microsoft Dynamics 365 au Québec

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

CRM Software Blog | Dynamics 365

2/1 Webinar: SharePoint Loves PowerApps! A Summary of SharePoint/PowerApps features by Ashish Trivedi

One of the earliest adopters of PowerApps and Flow, Ashish Trivedi, joins me this week to cover one of his favorite topics: how to use Microsoft Flow and PowerApps to get more out of your SharePoint installations. 

SharePoint Loves PowerApps! A Summary of SharePoint/PowerApps Features by Ashish Trivedi

Abstract: 

It has been a while since PowerApps has made its debut in Office 365 family. After Microsoft announced the new release of InfoPath, there were a lot of discussions in community. During this time, developers created their own pattern for forms and customizing lists alongside 3rd party products were released in the market. After the launch of PowerApps, you can see the shift in forms and business app customizations.

Business users and developers are using PowerApps capabilities with new Modern SharePoint features to build applications and provide the ROI to business. At same time, developers has used the development capabilities to extend it using Flow, Azure Functions and more.

In this session, we will summarise the SharePoint features which are being made available in PowerApps. This include, built in support for different field types, new/edit/display forms, built in connectors or rules, connecting to sources or triggering a flow on button clicks. This session will be all around SharePoint and how PowerApps strengthen the SharePoint.

When: 2/1/2018 10AM

Where: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQl8L-8Ggvk

 

 

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAcxAAAAJGRjMWIxMjIyLTE2YzgtNGUwYS04ZGI5LTNhYmY0YTI4OTkzYQ 2/1 Webinar: SharePoint Loves PowerApps! A Summary of SharePoint/PowerApps features by Ashish Trivedi

About Ashish Trivedi

Ashish has more than 10 years of hands-on experience with Office 365 + SharePoint and related technologies.
He has been involved in the enterprise applications design and development processes and drive the end user requirements to met the solution using technology.
He is capable of handling end to end engagements through different phases as pre-sales, solution design, planning development activities, customer expectations with technology solutions, Proof of concepts, submitting proposals, project planning, leading team to develop & deliver solution on time with zero defects.
Being a trusted consultant, he advises each of his customer to follow the recommended and best practices in technology and business domain solutions.
He has hands-on practical experience on implementing Six-Sigma (DMAIC) and ITIL process and manage projects using Agile/prototype development.
Expertise skills – Solution Architecture using Cloud technologies, Legacy system migrations to SharePoint, Application reverse-engineering
Primary Technology – SharePoint (on-premises/Online)
Related Technologies – Office 365, VSTO, Azure, PowerShell, C#, JavaScript, OpenXML, Win Phone 7, SQL Server

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Microsoft Power BI Blog | Microsoft Power BI

6 Key Trends for Business and Technology Decision Makers in 2018

By Paul Farrell, Vice President of Product Marketing

For business and IT professionals alike, 2018 brings with it the need for some calculated GettyImages 641406460 6 Key Trends for Business and Technology Decision Makers in 2018decision making when it comes to technology. As previous transformative technologies like customer relationship marketing (CRM), enterprise resource planning (ERP) and business intelligence (BI) reach maturity, emerging technologies now need to be accounted for. As global pressures increase, the next 12 months can make a huge difference for businesses’ fortunes moving forward.

Here are six technology trends businesses must account for in 2018.

CRM Takes a Back Seat to CX

As CRM reaches maturity, business and IT decision makers are realizing they need to take a more holistic approach to the customer experience (CX). In the coming years, companies need to be able to absorb technology that not only includes CRM, but omnichannel commerce and commerce marketing. Companies need a real 360-degree view of the customer, which goes beyond customer call notes and lead, opportunity and quote management. They will need solutions that help them manage their customers across all channels: sales force, store, B2B commerce, B2C commerce, EDI, social and more.

AI/ML Will Become a Must in Every IT Strategy

While the hype around artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) has reached unprecedented levels, the time has come where organizations must at the very least account for how they will one day use it. Whether they’re mapping out a two-year plan, five-year plan or further out, it’s going to require a foundational platform that allows for customization, is always on and always available.

These days, that means an open, cloud platform that allows the business to consume, and act upon, the insights delivered by AI/ML. Just as important, as AI finds new patterns and opportunities, organizations will need to be able to adjust their workflows – and fast. Their cloud platform doesn’t only need to be open, but easily customizable. Without customizable workflows, business will lose out on the value that AI brings. Businesses that wait to address the foundational platform will be delayed when the time comes to adopt AI.

New Insights Must Be Proactive and Intelligent

As Big Data continues to gain industry buzz, most companies are worried not about how to get more of it, but what to do with what they already have. Most firms are swimming in data but only use about a third of it. Worse, even fewer say they are good at translating the result of data and analytics into measurable business outcomes. It’s imperative for technology decision makers to focus on ways to make insights smarter and more forward looking. Rather than reading reports on what happened last month, business needs to be in step with what’s happening now. For example, when a discount is offered, the sales person needs to know the true impact on profitability. How many change orders, returns, late payments, etc. does the customer usually have for this type of order? Rather than find out that zero real profit has been made at the end the month, it would be far better for the sales person to know at the time of taking the order that no discount should be applied, and why.

Business intelligence systems based on data warehouses bolted on to the transactional system are already behind. The insights need to come directly from the core system. As different business units and employees upload more and more data, decision makers will have the most holistic view of their enterprises that they’ve ever had. Its cloud providers who will be able to view these constantly-expanding webs of transactions and operations across industries to provide rich, detailed insights to their clients with context for the intelligence at exactly the right time.

Everything Must be Global

The global economy is nothing new, but now companies of all sizes have access to global capacity and opportunity. We are at a stage where the world truly is smaller, and businesses must be able to take advantage – quickly. Already, today’s modern businesses no longer have employees, products and resources in the same facility; in many cases, they’re not even in the same country. Being able to take advantage of resources abroad, whether its talent, suppliers, manufacturing or products, is vital. Employees need to be able to view and optimize resources around the globe as easy as they could if they were all in the same site, city, state or country. At the same time, they should be able to handle the overhead of dealing with multi-legal entities, currencies, legislation, languages, etc. without increased administrative costs that wipe out the opportunity.

Amidst this opportunity comes new challenges, and not just with growth. For example, the coming year only promises to make it more complex with regulations like the GDPR in Europe. Businesses of all sizes must worry about international competition, but those that wish to truly operate internationally need systems that can operate and translate on a global scale. Multinational organizations need the cloud to keep their operations consistent across different currencies, languages, and regulations. Compliance is a significant concern as well as regulations evolve around the globe. According to McKinsey, some businesses are spending up to $ 50 million to update customer databases to be GDPR compliant. It is vital that companies deploy systems that support global operations as easily as local.

New Technology Needs to Be Consumed in Weeks, Not Years

The old way of adopting technology, with lengthy, complicated project plans, months- to years-long delays and lengthy training and change management no longer meets the needs of modern business. With the current pace of change, people need to be able to take on new technology quickly and easily. If it takes you two to three years to react, you’re done as a business. That means business software must be ready and fit for purpose immediately and can be changed and personalized for the user, division, company and enterprise quickly and without impacting new releases from the software provider. The modern business should also choose solutions with extensive ecosystems of partners who are able to instantly provide value-added capabilities that enable them to take advantage of new opportunities.

Every Solution Should Be a Cloud Solution

As technologies like IoT, blockchain and AI become more mainstream, it’s critical to incorporate them into current and future technology planning decisions. Yet, without a stable cloud foundation, it will be very difficult to implement these new, cutting-edge capabilities. These technologies demand a system that: is always available, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year; easy to change; easy to integrate; easy to consume; easy to use; has an extensive ecosystem; always accessible on any device, anytime and anywhere; always on the latest release. Finally, it needs to be able to scale with the needs of an emerging organization to that of a global enterprise without lengthy and costly re-implementations. In 2018, companies are realizing that the essential ingredient is a true cloud-based foundation that is both modern, flexible and proven.

Learn more about NetSuite’s Pathway to Success and catch up on our last 2018 Grow Series blog Family-owned Businesses, Divestitures and Innovators: NetSuite Customers Shine in 2017.

Posted on Mon, January 29, 2018
by NetSuite filed under

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

The NetSuite Blog

6 Key Trends for Business and Technology Decision Makers in 2018

By Paul Farrell, Vice President of Product Marketing

For business and IT professionals alike, 2018 brings with it the need for some calculated GettyImages 641406460 6 Key Trends for Business and Technology Decision Makers in 2018decision making when it comes to technology. As previous transformative technologies like customer relationship marketing (CRM), enterprise resource planning (ERP) and business intelligence (BI) reach maturity, emerging technologies now need to be accounted for. As global pressures increase, the next 12 months can make a huge difference for businesses’ fortunes moving forward.

Here are six technology trends businesses must account for in 2018.

CRM Takes a Back Seat to CX

As CRM reaches maturity, business and IT decision makers are realizing they need to take a more holistic approach to the customer experience (CX). In the coming years, companies need to be able to absorb technology that not only includes CRM, but omnichannel commerce and commerce marketing. Companies need a real 360-degree view of the customer, which goes beyond customer call notes and lead, opportunity and quote management. They will need solutions that help them manage their customers across all channels: sales force, store, B2B commerce, B2C commerce, EDI, social and more.

AI/ML Will Become a Must in Every IT Strategy

While the hype around artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) has reached unprecedented levels, the time has come where organizations must at the very least account for how they will one day use it. Whether they’re mapping out a two-year plan, five-year plan or further out, it’s going to require a foundational platform that allows for customization, is always on and always available.

These days, that means an open, cloud platform that allows the business to consume, and act upon, the insights delivered by AI/ML. Just as important, as AI finds new patterns and opportunities, organizations will need to be able to adjust their workflows – and fast. Their cloud platform doesn’t only need to be open, but easily customizable. Without customizable workflows, business will lose out on the value that AI brings. Businesses that wait to address the foundational platform will be delayed when the time comes to adopt AI.

New Insights Must Be Proactive and Intelligent

As Big Data continues to gain industry buzz, most companies are worried not about how to get more of it, but what to do with what they already have. Most firms are swimming in data but only use about a third of it. Worse, even fewer say they are good at translating the result of data and analytics into measurable business outcomes. It’s imperative for technology decision makers to focus on ways to make insights smarter and more forward looking. Rather than reading reports on what happened last month, business needs to be in step with what’s happening now. For example, when a discount is offered, the sales person needs to know the true impact on profitability. How many change orders, returns, late payments, etc. does the customer usually have for this type of order? Rather than find out that zero real profit has been made at the end the month, it would be far better for the sales person to know at the time of taking the order that no discount should be applied, and why.

Business intelligence systems based on data warehouses bolted on to the transactional system are already behind. The insights need to come directly from the core system. As different business units and employees upload more and more data, decision makers will have the most holistic view of their enterprises that they’ve ever had. Its cloud providers who will be able to view these constantly-expanding webs of transactions and operations across industries to provide rich, detailed insights to their clients with context for the intelligence at exactly the right time.

Everything Must be Global

The global economy is nothing new, but now companies of all sizes have access to global capacity and opportunity. We are at a stage where the world truly is smaller, and businesses must be able to take advantage – quickly. Already, today’s modern businesses no longer have employees, products and resources in the same facility; in many cases, they’re not even in the same country. Being able to take advantage of resources abroad, whether its talent, suppliers, manufacturing or products, is vital. Employees need to be able to view and optimize resources around the globe as easy as they could if they were all in the same site, city, state or country. At the same time, they should be able to handle the overhead of dealing with multi-legal entities, currencies, legislation, languages, etc. without increased administrative costs that wipe out the opportunity.

Amidst this opportunity comes new challenges, and not just with growth. For example, the coming year only promises to make it more complex with regulations like the GDPR in Europe. Businesses of all sizes must worry about international competition, but those that wish to truly operate internationally need systems that can operate and translate on a global scale. Multinational organizations need the cloud to keep their operations consistent across different currencies, languages, and regulations. Compliance is a significant concern as well as regulations evolve around the globe. According to McKinsey, some businesses are spending up to $ 50 million to update customer databases to be GDPR compliant. It is vital that companies deploy systems that support global operations as easily as local.

New Technology Needs to Be Consumed in Weeks, Not Years

The old way of adopting technology, with lengthy, complicated project plans, months- to years-long delays and lengthy training and change management no longer meets the needs of modern business. With the current pace of change, people need to be able to take on new technology quickly and easily. If it takes you two to three years to react, you’re done as a business. That means business software must be ready and fit for purpose immediately and can be changed and personalized for the user, division, company and enterprise quickly and without impacting new releases from the software provider. The modern business should also choose solutions with extensive ecosystems of partners who are able to instantly provide value-added capabilities that enable them to take advantage of new opportunities.

Every Solution Should Be a Cloud Solution

As technologies like IoT, blockchain and AI become more mainstream, it’s critical to incorporate them into current and future technology planning decisions. Yet, without a stable cloud foundation, it will be very difficult to implement these new, cutting-edge capabilities. These technologies demand a system that: is always available, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year; easy to change; easy to integrate; easy to consume; easy to use; has an extensive ecosystem; always accessible on any device, anytime and anywhere; always on the latest release. Finally, it needs to be able to scale with the needs of an emerging organization to that of a global enterprise without lengthy and costly re-implementations. In 2018, companies are realizing that the essential ingredient is a true cloud-based foundation that is both modern, flexible and proven.

Learn more about NetSuite’s Pathway to Success and catch up on our last 2018 Grow Series blog Family-owned Businesses, Divestitures and Innovators: NetSuite Customers Shine in 2017.

Posted on Mon, January 29, 2018
by NetSuite filed under

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

The NetSuite Blog