Category Archives: BI News and Info

Why Pour Your Tax Savings Into Digital Transformation?

 Why Pour Your Tax Savings Into Digital Transformation?

Part 2 of a 2-part series. Read Part 1.

In my last blog, I discussed the ways in which corporations are responding to the increased after-tax cash flow resulting from the new tax law here in the United States. These responses run the gamut from dividend increases and share buybacks to one-time employee bonuses and debt paydown.

But have you considered long-term benefits? Digital transformation can be the right move, at least if your goal is to generate long-term value for your business.

But what, exactly, is digital transformation?

Think of digital transformation as business reinvention. The goal is to improve business performance and transform the way you serve your customers using emerging digital technologies – such as Big Data, analytics, cloud computing, Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning, blockchain, and more.

The crux of any digital transformation is data. But data has been around forever. What’s new in the digital economy is the ability to use data to connect everything – people, devices, and business networks – in real time. With powerful technologies and platforms to manage these connections, we can now develop new services, new products, and new business models that deliver better outcomes for customers.

A nondisruptive framework for disruption

But, as I asked in my last blog, how do you move forward? The problem that most companies face when it comes to change is how to keep the lights on while transforming. If your goal is to disrupt an industry or two with leading-edge innovation, how do you do it without disrupting your own company?

The first step, frankly, is to accept the fact that change is always a constant – as clichéd as it may sound. Make your peace with change. Expect it. Encourage it. No digital transformation effort is a one-and-done scenario. Rather, it’s an ongoing effort. In fact, the platforms we build as part of our transformation efforts are themselves designed to facilitate change. Change is built into the design. The best response is to embrace it.

The second step is to start thinking in terms of two-lane IT (also called “bimodal IT”), a nondisruptive framework for disruption. In one lane, you have core IT systems to support core operations. Sometimes this is referred to as your system of record, which is critical to maintain. Part of a digital transformation journey should focus on optimizing processes and operations regarding the system of record.

In the other lane, you establish a system of innovation, which gives you the flexibility to develop new digital applications – and new business models – quickly. They range from IoT-enabled devices that track customer usage and charge per usage (rather than selling the machines as products) to machine learning algorithms that tell you more about your customers. Because most new applications in this lane will need to plug into data maintained in the other lane, the two are integrated. This system of innovation uses critical core data from operations to deliver new value for your business and your customers.

Think big but start small

As we dive into digital transformation, we should all think big. But when the rubber hits the road, most of us will start small with easy wins in the slower lane and move up the value chain. One model goes like this:

  • Better IT: Focus on cloud capabilities, getting right with your data, and optimizing systems.
  • Better decisions: Increase transparency, improve decision support, and automate decision-making where possible.
  • Better processes: Collapse cycle times, increase process flexibility, increase collaboration, build predictive capabilities.
  • Better products and services: Digitalize and optimize your offerings – and create new offerings that were previously untenable.
  • Better business models: Innovate with flexibility and devise outcome-based business models that help you enter new markets, attract new customers, and deliver the value that helps retain customers.

One study by the authors of “Leading Digital” (George Westerman, Didier Bonnet, and Andrew McAfee) finds that companies with stronger digital capabilities are better at driving revenue with their physical assets. Strong digital companies are 26% more profitable than their industry peers and generate nine percent more revenue from their assets. Beginners in the realm of digital transformation trail their competitors by four percent in revenue-generation efficiency and 24% in profitability.

While it might make sense for companies to use their increased after-tax cash flow for a wide range of laudable purposes, here at SAP, we’re dedicated to helping those that want to achieve long-term benefits through digital transformation. There’s a lot of opportunity out there – and companies with the capacity to change can seize it.

Gather more insight on Why Strategic Plans Need Multiple Futures.

Follow SAP Finance online: @SAPFinance (Twitter) | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Digitalist Magazine

Doc Ingo, what model should I use?

teach fish sq Doc Ingo, what model should I use?

One of the most frequent questions I get asked is: “Ingo, I am from Industry X and my data looks like Y and my colleague recommended to use model Z – what is your opinion on what model to use?”

In general, my philosophy for model selection is very simple: you should use whatever model type and parameterization works best for your data on a fitness function of your interest. As a consequence, I simply do not believe in recommendations like “this algorithm worked for me” or “this is a standard in our industry”. This does not mean that a particular model type is also the best solution for YOUR case. So, in this spirit, I refrain from giving specific model recommendations…

BUT, I would like to explain a well-proven framework for model selection:

1. Fitness Function

It all starts with defining the fitness function first. Is it a regression problem? What type of performance measurement can be used then to measure the success of a model? Relative error maybe? Or RMSE? Or correlation? Error costs? Or is it a classification problem? Is accuracy doing the trick for you or do you need a specific precision or recall for one of the classes? Whatever works, stick with it for now.

2. Try Models & Parameters

Then try out the different model types / function types / parameterizations and measure the performance according to the fitness function defined in point 1. Obviously, not every model can be used on every data set. You can get some guidance for what might work on your data from our Machine Learning Algorithm reference guide.

3. Correct Validation

You need to make sure that you validate the models correctly and in a comparable fashion. I wrote a complete white paper on correct model validation. I also wrote a bit about focusing too much on overfitting which is relevant for this as well. Bottom line: overfitting always happens but it doesn’t need to be a problem if you correctly validate the model.

4. Identify Potential Shortcuts

While you are going through your model candidates, notice what kind of models work better than others. This might be helpful to prune the search space somewhat. For example, if a k-NN works better with high numbers of k than with smaller ones, the problem is probably more linear in nature and you might want to focus more on those and less on the highly non-linear model types.

5. Pick a Model

At the end, go with the model which delivers the best correctly validated performance estimation. Not the one which was recommended by a colleague. You might even want to go with a sub-optimal model for other reasons like understandability or runtime for model computation. Finally, you might want to further optimize the model as well with more parameter optimization or (automatic) feature engineering.

Or you take the shortcut and let RapidMiner do all of this work with our new Auto Model feature 😊

I know, this is probably not the answer people are looking for when they ask, but I think it is better than just saying “Go with an RBF-kernel SVM”. It also follows the philosophy of teaching to fish vs. handing over a fish… 😉

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

RapidMiner

Why T&E Matters: Risk And Compliance

 Why T&E Matters: Risk And Compliance

Part 2 of the 5-part “T&E in the Cloud” series

If you’re in financial services (or any other regulated industry, for that matter), compliance comes with the territory. The flow of new regulations is not slowing down, and maintaining compliance can be a daily struggle.

Controlling costs and being compliant is, however, critical to the daily running of your organization. That means financial transparency, data integrity, and internal auditing.

It also means hours of crossing T’s, dotting I’s, and, according to Deloitte, facing “plenty of uncertainty around the impact of things like Open Banking and boosting cyber resilience.”

And, as you know, the downside for getting it wrong can be hefty fines and remedial actions demanded by regulators – hence the low tolerance for unethical behavior and actions causing reputational risk.

Always more to watch out for

And the regulatory landscape for managing expenses and spending is constantly shifting. You either need a team of people whose job it is to stay on top of the rules and restrictions, or you find a cloud-based solution that gives you full visibility into travel and expense (T&E) budgets and spending and, as a result, financial control.

Things your solutions should do:

  • Capture and connect all your travel and expense spend whether it’s booked through your booking tool, with your travel management company, directly with suppliers, or through virtually any other source.
  • Make compliance easier for everybody by giving employees simple, mobile tools that use automated controls to keep spending within policy.
  • Employ workflows that automatically adapt to changing policies, giving you real-time feedback and reports on out-of-policy spend without additional headcount.
  • Increase visibility into what spending is happening where, which makes it easier to reduce fraud.
  • Get a clear view of where employees are if there’s an emergency.

Regulations of many shapes and sizes

Staying compliant with your industry’s regulations is also an important factor. With complex approval and review processes, you need to be able to set spending thresholds that put you in control over who spends what where. And you need to establish policy protocols to ensure that information about attendees and attendee-type individuals that your organization has hosted is captured in compliance with requirements of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA).

But it’s bigger than that. It’s about your people and, more specifically, your duty to protect them wherever business takes them. You need to be able to capture all of their itinerary data and triangulate it with global risk information and other specialized resources. This will enable you to locate, communicate with, and, if necessary, extricate every traveler in any emergency, no matter where or how they booked their trip.

Cost savings through compliance

The mere mention of VAT has most financial services providers rightly running for cover. It’s a tax you simply have to pay, but you also have the chance to reclaim some of it – which is a complete headache. And because it’s only a partial exemption, it can be viewed as small potatoes.

But VAT also a provides a perfect example of the importance of clearly seeing your spend: If your annual T&E spend is $ 5 million, and you can reclaim VAT on just 20% of that – that’s $ 200,000 you could put back in your budget.

This, of course, requires data. And data, of course, isn’t always easy to acquire. So how do you get it? By making it simple for employees to provide it.

Give them easy, mobile tools, and employees can simply snap a photo of a receipt and hit “send.” The expense gets read, automatically matched to the transaction, and uploaded to an expense report. With these types of tools, expense reports virtually write themselves, employees have more time focus on work, and you turn data into money.

More control, less risk

The more visibility you have into T&E, the more control you have over everything. And when you have both, you have a lot less risk to worry about. You can manage every detail of your spend, automate your processes, protect your travelers, and get real-time data accuracy and insights – plus enterprise-class security solutions that protect against cyber attacks.

To learn more, reach out to T&E experts.

Follow SAP Finance online: @SAPFinance (Twitter) | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Digitalist Magazine

Teradata Board of Directors Strengthens Cloud Expertise

CustomerSuccess social share smallest Teradata Board of Directors Strengthens Cloud Expertise

Joanne Olsen brings significant cloud experience, including a mix of sales, support and product management

Teradata (NYSE: TDC), the leading cloud-based data and analytics company, today announced the election of Joanne Olsen to its board of directors, effective June 15, 2018. The new appointment expands the board from 10 to 11 directors and adds new enterprise-scale cloud expertise from one of the industry’s most senior leaders.

Most recently, Ms. Olsen served as Executive Vice President of Oracle Global Cloud Services and Support until she retired in August 2017. In that role, she drove Oracle’s cloud transformation services and support strategy, partnering with leaders across all business units. Ms. Olsen led a team of cloud customer experience experts, covering customer success, implementation success, consulting, support, education, and managed cloud services. She previously served as Senior Vice President and leader of Oracle’s applications sales, alliances, and consulting organizations in North America. Ms. Olsen began her career with IBM, where, over the course of more than three decades, she held a variety of executive management positions across sales, global financing and hardware.

 "We are pleased to welcome Joanne Olsen to our board," said James Ringler, Chairman, Teradata Corporation. “Joanne is an industry thought leader who truly understands how the cloud can lead to greater customer success, and she has a long history of transforming large organizations. Teradata is on the leading edge of cloud-based analytics, and we know that Joanne’s experience in managing global cloud services will greatly contribute to our leading position in the market.” 

Ms. Olsen was selected following a comprehensive search conducted by the board. She joins the Teradata board as a Class III director. Ms. Olsen’s expertise will assist Teradata in maintaining its position as the leading cloud-based data and analytics company. With business solutions that help customers analyze anything, anywhere, Teradata gives its customers the most reliable, secure and proven path to the cloud using the trusted gold standard for enterprise-class analytics and innovative licensing structures designed to de-risk the buying decision.

“Joanne brings a strong mix of sales, support, and product management experience to our team, along with a keen understanding of scale, SaaS business models, and enterprise technology go-to-market strategies,” said Victor Lund, President and Chief Executive Officer of Teradata Corporation. “We are pleased to welcome her to the board as we continue to develop the world’s most powerful data and analytics solutions.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Teradata United States

Wade Davis: Creating Equal Opportunities In The Workplace

 Wade Davis: Creating Equal Opportunities In The Workplace

In a recent episode of the SHE Innovates podcastMichelle King, a leader in the United Nations’ women’s gender innovation work, interviews Wade Davis, a former National Football League player and the first LGBT inclusion consultant for professional sports leagues. During the podcast, he shares how men can fight sexism in the workplace – starting with speaking up. Wade also talks about Blindspots, a training program he launched to help men understand the issues women face in the workplace.

Davis notes that he wasn’t always aware of these issues while in the NFL: “When you’re playing, you just want to play the sport . . . you don’t think that you have the mental bandwidth to do anything else.” When he stopped playing, he reflected on the price of not coming out as a gay man: “I paid an individual cost of never being able to be my full and authentic self.”

Addressing the roots of sexism and inequality

Regardless of orientation or gender identity, Davis says women are always at a disadvantage because of the insidious nature of patriarchy: “They are constantly worried about their status and have to modulate feelings of someone else just to survive.” His passion around gender equality was influenced by Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center, in which author Bell Hooks talks about slavery through the lens of women’s experience.

“Everything I was fighting for in LGBT equality was rooted in patriarchy and sexism… it always goes back to women,” Davis says. He believes undoing the patriarchy paves the road for gender equality. We need to realize that when women are oppressed, men are too, he says.

The challenge in advocating for inclusion and equality is making sure you aren’t doing it for the wrong reasons. Davis is aware that taking space from women who’ve been fighting for equality is a type of oppression and actively avoids doing so. He always gives credit to people whose ideas he’s “repackaged in a way that’s accessible to men.”

Men often don’t realize that an equitable workplace elevates them too. Equal opportunities create more space for men and women: “We can recreate the corporate world in a way that everyone benefits, but we don’t imagine this is possible because we’ve grown up in a society of competition instead of solidarity.” We need to realize that all of us grow in an inclusive environment, he believes.

Engaging in open conversations

Davis recognized the value of having conversations with both athletes and men in the corporate space to help them recognize “you don’t need to be right.” These conversations morphed into training and workshops that were experiential and engaging to men. He provided spaces where men could say things that are “problematic.” Players are curious as to what it means to be LGBT, says Davis. He took part in the “High Five” initiative to remove the gulf that exists between the LGBT community and athletes. Davis says it’s an exchange that creates “awareness, connection, action.”

For Davis, building Blindspots was important for creating spaces where people can be vulnerable and honest while learning more about complex issues. One of Davis’s goal is to reach white men in the corporate world: “There’s a reason why the group that’s supposed to have the highest level of power… also has the highest level of suicide.” In 2016, white males accounted for seven out of 10 suicides. They need to be a part of the conversation to achieve true inclusiveness.

Impact of gender equality work and advice to men

The athlete says the greatest result of his work is people asking how they can help. He advises more men to start a book club, because “they need a baseline of education and experience.” He wants people to practice speaking up – asking questions like, “what do you mean by that?” when someone makes a sexist remark to show that you’re not okay with it. “We have to get better at backing up our words with actions.”

Listen to Wade Davis’s interview on the SHE Innovates podcast.

SHE Innovates is a podcast that shares the stories, challenges and triumphs of women across innovation, technology and entrepreneurship. Listen to all our podcasts on PodBean.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Digitalist Magazine

Cumulative Update #12 for SQL Server 2014 SP2

The 12th cumulative update release for SQL Server 2014 SP2 is now available for download at the Microsoft Downloads site. Please note that registration is no longer required to download Cumulative updates.
To learn more about the release or servicing model, please visit:

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

SQL Server Release Services

NDSolve missing dynamics

I am trying to use NDSolve to solve some a set ODEs coupled in a slightly slightly unusual, and am running into some problems.

The following code generates the equations of interest, where one the solution of one ODE is used as the initial condition for a second, generating a collection of 2D interpolating functions (apologies for the large matrix, this is the minimal example I could think of!):

(*Prepare vector of dependent variables*)
Rho[t_]= Flatten@Array[Subscript[r,#1,#2][t]&,{3,3}];
Lamb[t_, tau_]=Flatten@Array[Subscript[La,#1,#2][t,tau]&,{3,3}];

(*Include propagator matrix*)
lio ={{-0.0000506308, 0. + 1. I, 0, 0. - 1. I, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0}, {0. + 1.I, -9.72405, 0, 0, 0. - 1. I, 0, 0, 0, 0}, {0,  0, -4.72405, 0, 0, 0. - 1. I, 0, 0, 0}, {0. - 1. I, 0, 0, -9.72405,   0. + 1. I, 0, 0, 0, 0}, {0, 0. - 1. I, 0, 0. + 1. I, -10., 0, 0, 0,   0}, {0, 0, 0. - 1. I, 0, 0, -5., 0, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 0, 0, 0,   0, -4.72405, 0. + 1. I, 0}, {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0. + 1. I, -5.,   0}, {0.0000506308, 0, 0, 0, 10., 0, 0, 0, 0}};

(*Solve the first ODE*) 
rho0 = {1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0};
Rsol = First@NDSolve[{D[Rho[t],t]==lio.Rho[t], Rho[0]==rho0}, Rho[t],{t,0,100}];

(*Solve the second ODE using the first as initial condition*) 
Lam0 = {0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0. + 1. Subscript[r, 2, 1][t], 0. + 1. Subscript[r, 2, 2][t], 0. + 1. Subscript[r, 2, 3][t]}/.Rsol;
LambSol = NDSolveValue[{D[Lamb[t,tau],tau]==lio.Lamb[t,tau], Lamb[t,0] == Lam0},Lamb[t,tau],{t,0,100},{tau,0,3}];

The issue arises when we compare the solutions in the t variable. Plotting RSol[[5]] and the matching element LambSol[[-2]], with tau = 0, we find:

Show[LogLinearPlot[{Evaluate[Rho[t][[5]]/.Rsol],Evaluate[LambSol[[-2]]/.tau->0]},{t,10^-3,20}],
ListLogLinearPlot[Transpose[{LambSol[[-2,0]]["Coordinates"][[1]],
LambSol[[-2,0]]["ValuesOnGrid"][[All,1]]}],PlotStyle->Red]]

TUvF7 NDSolve missing dynamics

As you can see the dynamics found from the second ODE solution (yellow) doesn’t match the converged solution from RSol (blue). I think the reason is that NDSolve is not taking enough points the along the t-axis in second NDSolve (given by the red points). I can fix this to an extent by decreasing MaxStepFraction, however taking this too small or for systems of equations that are too large makes the code take excessive amounts of time, or the Kernel crash.

Does anybody have insight into using NDSolve in this way? I’m at a loss of how to tackle this problem.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Recent Questions – Mathematica Stack Exchange

Cumulative Update #9 for SQL Server 2016 SP1

The 9th cumulative update release for SQL Server 2016 SP1 is now available for download at the Microsoft Downloads site. Please note that registration is no longer required to download Cumulative updates.
To learn more about the release or servicing model, please visit:

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

SQL Server Release Services

Numerically integrate function with sudden jumps

 Numerically integrate function with sudden jumps

I want to integrate the function

Log [ (x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(
x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))]

for x,t and y between -50 and 50. This function jumps suddenly at x=-y, so the code

NIntegrate[SetPrecision[Log [ (x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-(x + y)^2/(2 0.00001)], 10], {x, -50, 50}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, -50, 50}, Method -> {"GlobalAdaptive", "SingularityDepth" -> 8, "SingularityHandler" -> "IMT"}, MinRecursion -> 30, MaxRecursion -> 40, WorkingPrecision -> 10 ]

gives the following output:

NIntegrate::errprec: Catastrophic loss of precision in the global error estimate due to insufficient WorkingPrecision or divergent integral.

Then, i thought about partitioning the region, which is a square, in 6 sub-regions, as follows:

NIntegrate[
SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log[ (x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, -50, 0}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, -50, 0}, Method -> {"GlobalAdaptive", "SingularityDepth" -> 8, "SingularityHandler" -> "IMT"}, MinRecursion -> 30, MaxRecursion -> 40, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10] + NIntegrate[SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log[ (x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, -50, 0}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, 0, -x}, Method -> {"GlobalAdaptive", "SingularityDepth" -> 8, "SingularityHandler" -> "IMT"}, MinRecursion -> 30, MaxRecursion -> 40, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10] + NIntegrate[SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log[ (x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, -50, 0}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, -x, 50}, Method -> {"GlobalAdaptive", "SingularityDepth" -> 8, "SingularityHandler" -> "IMT"}, MinRecursion -> 30, MaxRecursion -> 40, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10] + NIntegrate[SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log[ (x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, 0, 50}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, 0, 50}, Method -> {"GlobalAdaptive", "SingularityDepth" -> 8, "SingularityHandler" -> "IMT"}, MinRecursion -> 30, MaxRecursion -> 40, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10] + NIntegrate[SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log[ (x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, 0, 50}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, -x, 0}, Method -> {"GlobalAdaptive", "SingularityDepth" -> 8, "SingularityHandler" -> "IMT"}, MinRecursion -> 30, MaxRecursion -> 40, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10] + NIntegrate[SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log[ (x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, 0, 50}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, -50, -x}, Method -> {"GlobalAdaptive", "SingularityDepth" -> 8, "SingularityHandler" -> "IMT"}, MinRecursion -> 30, MaxRecursion -> 40, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10]

Mathematica is able to compute this integral and gives the answer 129869.8932. But, I decided to compute the same thing using other code:

NIntegrate[SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log[(x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, -50, 0}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, -50, 0}, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10] + NIntegrate[SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log [ (x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, -50, 0}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, 0, -x}, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10] + NIntegrate[SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log[(x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, -50, 0}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, -x, 50}, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10] + NIntegrate[SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log[ (x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, 0, 50}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, 0, 50}, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10] + NIntegrate[SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log [(x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, 0, 50}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, -x, 0}, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10] + NIntegrate[SetPrecision[(50^2)/Log[ (x^2 + t^2 + m^2 + 50^2)/(x^2 + t^2 + m^2)] Exp[-((x + y)^2/(2 0.00001))], 10], {x, 0, 50}, {t, -50, 50}, {y, -50, -x}, AccuracyGoal -> 10, WorkingPrecision -> 10]

and then the answer is 2.738034446*10^-18!
Mathematica does not warn be about any issues in the computation, the calculations are done in seconds, so it seems like everything is ok, but the results differ by more than 20 orders of magnitude!
Anyone knows what is happening? And how should I deal with the singularity of my integral?

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Recent Questions – Mathematica Stack Exchange

Arianna Huffington And Jennifer Breithaupt: Achieve More By Going Offline

 Arianna Huffington And Jennifer Breithaupt: Achieve More By Going Offline

On this SHE Innovates episode, Michelle King, a leader in UN women’s gender innovation work, speaks with Arianna Huffington, founder of Thrive Global, and Jennifer Breithaupt, global consumer chief marketing officer at Citi, about how women can do less and achieve more. They discuss how technology can help women boost well-being and improve performance at work, and what #PressForProgress, this year’s theme for International Women’s Day, means for each of them.

The message behind #PressForProgress

For Huffington, #PressForProgress is about changing workplace culture. Despite many organizations’ efforts to increase the number of women in executive positions, the needle hasn’t moved much. Too often, workplaces are fueled by stress, which leads to burnout and creates the “illusion that to succeed you need to always be on—never disconnecting.” Many studies show such environments lead to lower productivity and less empathy for colleagues. They can take a toll on health as well: Women who experience job-related stress have a 40% higher risk of heart disease and 60% greater risk of diabetes. The bottom line? Employees should not be forced to sacrifice their health and their relationships for a job.

Although some progress has been made in recent years, Breithaupt notes that women remain significantly underrepresented in business. McKinsey’s 2017 report, Why Diversity Matters, shows that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity on their executive teams were 15% more likely to enjoy above-average profitability than companies in the fourth quartile. In 2018, this number rose to 21%. Gender diversity is a key enabler for business growth. We need to continue implementing solutions for workplace inclusion.

How can organizations better support women?

Huffington suggests starting small—for example, asking questions such as “Are there places for nursing mothers to pump milk for their babies?” can go a long way to encourage policies that foster inclusivity. Does the organization offer opportunities such as mentorships for employees to establish strong working relationships and paths to career advancement? Huffington points out that social events in which employees are expected to bond with co-workers in frat-like party settings are not uncommon, especially in the startup world, and these can make women and others uncomfortable.

On an individual level, Huffington describes one of her biggest career challenges as “dealing with the obnoxious roommate in [her] head.” Self-criticism can take a loud voice for many women, and she recommends learning to deal with it by living in the present and avoiding unproductive, negative self-talk.

Breithaupt advocates for a workplace culture that supports balance: “Don’t send a flurry of emails on a Sunday night that upset everyone.” Additionally, she adds, women need to empower each other and teach the skills needed to compete at a higher level.

The pervasiveness of our digital devices

According to King, the average American smartphone user touches their phone about 2,617 times a day. She says the need to always be available increases our stress level and adversely impacts our health. Breithaupt agrees, adding, “People are just not present.”

Citi and Thrive Global are taking concrete steps to address this situation by developing applications that help us reduce the time we spend online because, Huffington explains, “it is almost a backlash against technology and companies that are trying to hijack people’s attention with endless notifications.” She wants to see companies promote technology that makes life easier instead of trying to consume more time from our lives.

Thrive Global recently launched the Thrive App, which puts your phone on “thrive mode” when you want to remain distraction-free. If someone tries to contact you, they are informed that you’re unavailable. “Right now, if somebody texts me and I don’t respond within 5 minutes,” Huffington says, “they’ll call 911.” Of course, the app includes an option for instant responses—she simply wants a way to honor people whose lives are well-organized and who understand the need to put down their devices.

Advice for women to be more effective day-to-day

Instead of coming up with a single, potentially unachievable international women’s day resolution, Huffington offers a challenge: “Start and end your day in an intentional way.” Strive to be able to say: “I’ve done everything I can do today; my day is done.”

We all get hooked on going online and dealing with endless tasks. But if we prioritize properly, Huffington says, we can declare an arbitrary end to the day. She suggests turning off all devices and removing them from the bedroom. This natural transition from the workday allows time to recharge. “Women have such an incredible slate of things on their plate every date,” Breithaupt says, “we just need to allow them to disconnect.”

Listen to Arianna Huffington and Jennifer Breithaupt’s interview on the SHE Innovates podcast.

SHE Innovates is a podcast that shares the stories, challenges, and triumphs of women across innovation, technology, and entrepreneurship. Listen to all our podcasts on PodBean.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Digitalist Magazine