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5 Key Elements of a Winning Employee Advocacy Program

5 Key Elements of a Winning Employee Advocacy Program 351x200 5 Key Elements of a Winning Employee Advocacy Program

Two million blog posts are written every day. You can only imagine how many other content pieces are out there. This information overload makes it extremely tough for marketers to stand out. Sometimes, all it takes is one viral infographic or video, but most times, that isn’t the case. Rather than focusing on what content to publish, you should also be focusing on who delivers your content.

This is where employee advocacy comes in.

The idea is to simply get employees to share your content across their personal social networks ‒ to tap into their connections to help grow your reach, engagement, and conversions exponentially. While there’s no universal strategy for running an advocacy program, there are some things you can do to maximize its ROI. To get started, here are five key elements to include:

1. Quality Content

Above all, the content that you provide employee advocates should be of high quality. But what defines “quality content”?

Quality content can range from a 4,000-word eBook to a 1-minute video clip. It can take weeks to produce, or just a few hours. There’s no set criteria for creating quality content. However, you need to make sure that employees are sharing content that exceeds their audience’s expectations. Focus on content that is valuable yet super engaging.

Starting with the latter, you can make your content more engaging by:

  • turning average blog posts into beautiful infographics;
  • adding short GIFs and videos into your social content; and
  • posting polls and statistics that get people involved.

Next, don’t settle for one type of content ‒ go for a variety of original and curated pieces. Original content includes eBooks, case studies, webinars, blog posts, etc., that your marketing team created. Curated content consists of valuable articles and resources from third-party websites that educate your audience in a less self-promotional way.

Moreover, creating content that is valuable boils down to matching your readers’ intent. Take advantage of employees’ ability to gain insights and opinions about their audience; then use this information to create content that they’ll be interested in. This will also empower your advocates by proving their impact in the program.

2. Personalization

Now, more than ever, customers want you to connect with them on a real and personal level. Employee advocates add this element of personalization by putting faces to your brand. They create a human bridge between your company and customers.

Taking this element of personalization to the next level, you can increase engagement by getting employees to share content that’s relevant to their role in the company and to the particular audience. For example, consider your salespeople. What type of content do they enjoy sharing? What type of content is going to best resonate with their audience?

Generally, your salespeople are more likely to share thought-leadership pieces, industry-related reports, and articles from well-known publications, because these help to position them as knowledgeable and professional. On the other hand, content that’s technical in nature will be perceived as less relevant by your sales team ‒ and similarly, by their audience.

3. Simple Sharing

Another way to set your employee advocacy program for success is by fostering an environment of easy and effortless sharing. Whether advocates are attending a conference or sitting on the bus, it’s important to make it as simple as possible for them to share a large amount of content, no matter where they are.

By using a proper social advocacy platform, you can make tasks like sharing content an easy daily routine for employees. Rather than having to search for content on their own, employees who use an advocacy platform like Oktopost are guided on which content topics to post, when to post, and how to do so. Giving employees the necessary tools will get the ball rolling in your program and ensure that more content gets shared.

4. Incentive Strategy

Employees are the most essential asset of your marketing initiatives. Failing to incentivize them will result in less content being shared. Research shows that 69% of employees would work harder if their efforts were better appreciated.

Having a well-planned incentive strategy makes a huge difference and can really boost the ROI of your program. For now, here are a few examples of strategies that companies implement:

  • Monetary Rewards: Offer monetary rewards such as Amazon gift cards and movie vouchers ‒ or even upgrade advocates’ LinkedIn profiles to ‘Premium.’
  • Learning Opportunities: Give advocates the opportunity to improve their skills and expertise in the form of seminars, guest lectures, and training activities.
  • Recognition: Acknowledge employees for their involvement and contributions in front of their co-workers to boost their sense of confidence and accomplishment.
  • Fun Activities: Invite advocates for a fun and easygoing activity like a movie day or a night at a bar. Such a reward should be offered to the team or department that achieved the highest performance in the program, for example, the most content shared or the most clicks generated.

The type of incentive strategy you choose will depend on the number of advocates you have, your company’s hierarchy, and the personas that make up your program. For example, advocates from sales are more likely to value monetary rewards, while marketers will most appreciate public recognition.

5. Measurement

It’s easy to launch a program and then just hope for the best, but to make it a big success you must track and analyze its performance every step of the way. First, ask yourself what “success” looks like in your program. Is it the impact on reach? The increase in social chatter about your company? Or maybe the growth in the number of leads? By setting specific KPI’s, you can determine what’s working and what’s not. You can understand if your content needs improving, if you’re posting to the right channels, and if you’re reaching the right audience.

It’s important that you accurately tie these metrics to individual employee performance and to ROI. For the latter, you’ll need an advanced platform like Oktopost. Oktopost consolidates all of your social media marketing activities in one place for easy management and reporting.

In your advocacy program, Oktopost allows you to track everything from which prospects converted, to which employee brought in the conversion, to the type of content the employee posted. It also enables you to measure the metrics gathered by your advocacy program in the ecosystem of your other marketing initiatives. The more you measure and make adjustments, the more successful your program will be.

A winning employee advocacy program requires a lot more than giving employees content to share. Implement these five elements for a sustainable and fruitful program that can be tied to ROI, and help your employees spread the word about your brand.

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Origins of the elements on the Periodic table

 Origins of the elements on the Periodic table

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About Krisgo

I’m a mom, that has worn many different hats in this life; from scout leader, camp craft teacher, parents group president, colorguard coach, member of the community band, stay-at-home-mom to full time worker, I’ve done it all– almost! I still love learning new things, especially creating and cooking. Most of all I love to laugh! Thanks for visiting – come back soon icon smile Origins of the elements on the Periodic table

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Aligning elements in the Power Bi Desktop Designer – Workaround #powerbi

November 27, 2015 / Erik Svensen

Aligning elements in the Power Bi Desktop Designer – Workaround #powerbi

While we are waiting for the alignment feature of the elements in the Power BI Designer – you can vote for it here, – https://ideas.powerbi.com/forums/265200-power-bi/suggestions/6932400-add-alignment-positioning-and-sizing-controls-for – I have found a workaround that you might find useful.

If you press CTRL while selecting two elements on the page the placeholders for the elements is visible on screen.

 Aligning elements in the Power Bi Desktop Designer – Workaround #powerbi

After selection, you can change the size of the element you want to resize and use the handles of the other element to align with.

OBS – When you have multi-selected elements you can also move them as a group.

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Erik Svensen

Exclude elements from mapping

I have had this problem way too often and still have not found a solution, yet. The example is as follows:

numbers = Range[1, 50];
(numbers = Delete[numbers, 50 - #];
   #) & /@ numbers

Of course, this does not work as intended. The idea would be to get only the numbers from 1 to 25 as an output. But one cannot modify the part behind the /@. I am very aware of that. This shall only serve as an illustration of what I was hoping to find. Usually, the codes are more complex. But the problem remains the same: I want to exclude some elements from the mapping. But what elements I want to exclude is unclear during the initialization of the mapping.

So, my question is whether there is a known optimized solution to this problem. I have searched it but did not find anything.

Recommended article: Chomsky: We Are All – Fill in the Blank.
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Exclude elements from mapping

I have had this problem way too often and still have not found a solution, yet. The example is as follows:

numbers = Range[1, 50];
(numbers = Delete[numbers, 50 - #];
   #) & /@ numbers

Of course, this does not work as intended. The idea would be to get only the numbers from 1 to 25 as an output. But one cannot modify the part behind the /@. I am very aware of that. This shall only serve as an illustration of what I was hoping to find. Usually, the codes are more complex. But the problem remains the same: I want to exclude some elements from the mapping. But what elements I want to exclude is unclear during the initialization of the mapping.

So, my question is whether there is a known optimized solution to this problem. I have searched it but did not find anything.

Recommended article: Chomsky: We Are All – Fill in the Blank.
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Recent Questions – Mathematica Stack Exchange

The 3 Essential Elements of a Customer Management Strategy

 The 3 Essential Elements of a Customer Management StrategyConstant change, uncontrollable variables, and competitors on the prowl for new ways of eating your lunch: welcome to the world of sales. No, it isn’t a jungle out there, but it is a complex, fast-paced field of play.

Each company’s specific market position, competitive threats, capabilities and personnel are different from even its closest competitors. It stands to reason, then, that every company needs its own customer management strategy.

Our research and experience with customers demonstrate that developing your customer management strategy is the most important thing to start with, because that’s the foundation of how you run the organization. It’s the foundation of what you do as a business. Defining these customer management strategies is a crucial task for every sales leader.

When this task is left undone or incomplete, the usual result is that each salesperson handles customer management according to their individual preferences. Some approaches will be more successful than others, but even the top performers will be operating outside a defined customer engagement process.  In that situation, account continuity, funnel integrity and forecast accuracy all suffer. Customer management strategy is indeed the foundation of how a sales organization is run.

The essential elements of a customer management strategy are:  

1. Managing Relationships

For every sales professional, the sales culture in which they work shapes their understanding of what it means to manage customer and prospect relationships. Sales leadership provides a framework that accounts for cost of sales, market position, complexity of the product or solution and other factors.   

2. Creating Opportunities

Prospecting is hard and lonely work, and often it isn’t even time well spent. Marketing needs to get the right messages out—via the right channels—to generate demand that can be converted into qualified leads so that the sales team’s prospecting efforts actually lead to meaningful new conversations. Many companies are now encouraging their salespeople to be active in social channels, but this can do more harm than good if these individual efforts are not in sync with marketing’s messages.

3. Managing Opportunities

The first step in managing opportunities is to qualify them. Beginning with a proven strategy helps salespeople use defined criteria to determine which opportunities are worth the investment of their time and resources. The second step is to learn as much as possible about the customer’s decision dynamic—buying influences, customer issues and competitive positioning. That will form the basis of the next customer interaction. From there, at each step of the way, a good customer management strategy provides the guidance and insights to allow the salesperson to confirm that the opportunity is on track.

Joe Galvin, one of the sales world’s most prominent thought leaders, is now a Salesforce Sales Community contributor. This community is a new collaborative networking group for sales executives sharing best practices and innovations in sales leadership. We encourage all Salesforce customers to join Galvin and other top sales thought leaders in the new Salesforce Sales Community. 

About the Author:

 The 3 Essential Elements of a Customer Management StrategyJoe Galvin leads the MHI Research Institute, formerly known as Miller Heiman Research Institute, as Chief Research Officer. (Miller Heiman has joined with four other companies to form MHI Global.) His mission is to continuously research, measure, and analyze the best practices, innovations, and emerging trends for complex B2B sales organizations to provide clients with the insights required to make strategic decisions.

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parsed matrix not deleting elements in adjusted matrix

I have a matrix that has been parsed to delete certain rows and columns, as well as delete certain elements on the diagonal on the matrix. The problem is that it does this in theory when i take the elements in terms of w[i,j]. However, when I put in an equation for w[i,j], it does not actually delete the elements. Here is the code in theory where it works M = 10; initselect = 5; secselect = 6; k[i_] := Sum[w[i, j], {j, 1, M}]; V[i_, j_] := Piecewise[{{w[i, i] – k[i], i == j}, {w[i, j], i > j}, {w[i, j], i < j}}] matrix = Table[V[i, j], {i, M}, {j, M}]; (This generates the original matrix that is unparsed) (MatrixForm[matrix]) stay = Join[Range[initselect], Range[secselect, M, 2]]; TrueMatrix = matrix[[stay, stay]]; (This generates the matrix that has parsed the selected rows and \ columns) MatrixForm[TrueMatrix]

(delete=Complement[Range[M],Join[Range[5],Range[6,M,2]]];) delete = Complement[Range[M], stay]; TrueMatrix /. w[_, Alternatives @@ delete] -> 0 // MatrixForm

It initially deletes the appropriate rows and columns to get the TrueMatrix, then the last line it also deletes the appropriate elements on the diagonal.

Now here is the code with an equation for w[i,j] M = 10; initselect = 5; secselect = 6; k[i_] := Sum[w[i, j], {j, 1, M}]; w[i_, j_] := i*j^2 V[i_, j_] := Piecewise[{{w[i, i] – k[i], i == j}, {w[i, j], i > j}, {w[i, j], i < j}}] matrix = Table[V[i, j], {i, M}, {j, M}]; (This generates the original matrix that is unparsed) (MatrixForm[matrix]) stay = Join[Range[initselect], Range[secselect, M, 2]]; TrueMatrix = matrix[[stay, stay]]; MatrixForm[TrueMatrix] (This generates the matrix that has parsed the selected rows and \ columns) (MatrixForm[TrueMatrix];)

(delete=Complement[Range[M],Join[Range[5],Range[6,M,2]]];) delete = Complement[Range[M], stay]; TrueMatrix /. w[_, Alternatives @@ delete] -> 0 // MatrixForm

Here when I print the TrueMatrix and when it computes the last line to get the final matrix, they are identical which shouldn’t be the case and isn’t the case when I just use w[i,j] without and expression.

Thank you for your help

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