Tag Archives: Measure

Know Your B2B Marketing Metrics: Measure Your Way to Success

b2b marketing metrics 351x200 Know Your B2B Marketing Metrics: Measure Your Way to Success

Many of us who were kids in the ‘70s have strong memories of being taught that The Metric System was on the way. As we memorized facts like how many centimeters are in a foot, we were told that we’d soon be thinking about distance in terms of meters rather than yards and that we’d never buy a gallon of milk again once the United States made the big transition to the measurements used by the rest of the world.

Spoiler Alert: That never actually happened in this country, at least not on a mass scale. Americans still try to lose pounds instead of kilograms, and a 40-degree day is still considered chilly, not scorching hot.

A metric system of another sort, however, has transformed the way we do business. Now organizations of all types realize the importance of using marketing metrics to track and measure many kinds of information. B2B marketers use this data to shape campaigns, figure out their team’s impact on revenue, and justify budgets, among other applications.

“One of the biggest investments a company makes is in its marketing organization,” said David Lewis, President and CEO, DemandGen International. “The pressure on marketers to say how these investments are paying off is enormous, and it’s going to keep growing.”

Those trends mean that marketing metrics aren’t just nice to have – they’re absolutely essential. Having the right metrics at the right time can reveal how your campaigns perform, where you’re spending has the greatest impact, and how your campaigns impact the sales pipeline. Marketers need to know which metrics enable them to explain — and sell — a marketing plan to their CEO and CFO.

1. Picking the Right Metrics: Keep it Simple!

Part of the metrics challenge for B2B marketers is choosing what to assess. The good news is that you don’t need to track and analyze every possible data point to build a successful measurement strategy. In fact, the best course is usually to take a simple approach: Concentrate on a relatively small set of clear metrics that you can understand and put to work right away.

In that spirit, we’re going to focus here on two categories of marketing metrics: revenue metrics and program metrics. Some people think of these in terms of “strategic” big-picture metrics versus “tactical” day-to-day metrics. But it may be more useful to think of them this way:

  • Revenue metrics are what you’ll show to your CEO, CFO, and board to document your contribution to revenue and profit growth.
  • Program metrics are what you’ll use internally to gauge the impact of your campaigns,

database management, and sales-marketing alignment.

Let’s look at both types of metrics in greater detail and discuss some specific examples.

2. Revenue Metrics: Painting the Big Picture

Revenue metrics are easy to understand when you engage in a simple thought exercise:

Pretend that you’re being asked to explain your marketing plan to your CEO and CFO. What kinds of metrics tell a story that they will understand and embrace – especially when the time comes to justify your budget?

The answer to this question begins with your marketing funnel and continues through your company’s sales pipeline. It’s extremely important to quantify your marketing team’s impact in terms of converting leads to closed deals and revenue.

“A lot of marketers produce metrics that only measure activity, such as inquiries or leads generated,” said Jon Russo, Founder of B2B Fusion Group. “That’s meaningless at the executive level; it needs to be translated into revenue impact.”

Here are some key revenue-related metrics that allow you to accomplish this goal:

  • Marketing Lead Metrics

Inquiries or Raw Leads are often the first metric that matters to a CEO, since this is the point where your marketing team actually begins its qualification process and separates the “suspects” from the “prospects.”

A related metric involves net new leads added to a marketing contact database. This number – for example, 5,000 new names added per quarter – allows marketers to demonstrate that they can generate the raw material required to feed a company’s funnel. Marketing Qualified Leads (MQLs) represent the next step into the marketing funnel, where individual prospects show the right level of buying intent to pass them along to sales.

  • Sales Lead Metrics

Sales Accepted Leads (SALs) are MQLs that the sales team has qualified and moved into the sales pipeline. SALs are an important indicator that marketing and sales are on the same page about what they consider a qualified lead. These criteria usually involve factors like

job titles and firmographics, such as “CIOs of companies with 100 or more employees,” or

online behavior, such as “people who downloaded at least three pieces of content and visited our website more than twice in the past month.”

  • Sales Qualified Leads (SQLs)

SQLs have been moved into the sales pipeline and get actively worked by sales reps. This is a critical metric for both the sales and marketing team: It’s the point where leads are entered into Salesforce.com or some other CRM. As a result, this is also the point where a lead is often associated with a potential revenue value.

Many CRM systems or third-party metrics tools allow a sales team to measure this revenue potential as it moves through the pipeline. When this information is combined with data on a sales team’s historical close rates, it’s possible to make accurate revenue forecasts – a key figure for anyone concerned with revenue-focused metrics.

  • Conversion Metrics

Conversions from one funnel segment to the next are actually a function of the other metrics we discuss here. Higher conversion rates, especially as leads turn into opportunities and then customers, indicate a more efficient marketing effort that delivers what the sales team needs to hit its numbers.

The same applies to velocity metrics that measure how long it takes for leads and opportunities to move through each stage of the marketing funnel or sales pipeline. Velocity metrics can provide important hints about which marketing activities have the best impact on ROI. Higher velocity usually indicates more efficient marketing activities that generate faster, higher ROI.

  • Nurturing Metrics

Lead nurturing gives you a way to stay engaged with leads that aren’t ready to buy yet but will be in the future. Re-engagement metrics cover situations such as leads that don’t score high enough to convert to MQLs, or SALs that turn out not to be valid opportunities. The better you are at placing these leads in a nurturing campaign, and ultimately moving them back into the sales pipeline, the more you’ll contribute to revenue growth.

3. Program Metrics: Dealing with the Details

Your CEO may not want to hear the details about which programs or campaigns deliver the best results, but your marketing team certainly does. After all, your day-to-day program execution – everything from email and social media to webinars and website content – provides the raw material that ultimately drives your strategic revenue-building efforts.

It’s impossible to list all of the metrics that you can extract from email campaigns, web analytics, webinar attendance, and other sources. But there are some general measurement criteria that you can use to sort through them all:

  • Benchmarking Metrics

Marketers track a wide variety of day-to-day program activities because they’re easy to measure – and because almost everybody else measures them, too. These include benchmarks such as:

  • email open rates and click-through rates
  • website visits and page views
  • content asset downloads
  • website form completion and abandonment rates

These numbers can be very useful. If your email open rates, for example, are lower than the industry average, then it’s time to examine your email campaigns for potential problems. The same is true for web analytics, especially when you compare current data versus historical trends. Just be careful not to dwell upon these metrics, because they don’t always have a direct impact on marketing campaign performance.

  • Social Media Metrics

Social media mentions, connections, “likes,” and conversations are similar to other benchmarking metrics; you’re often comparing your metrics to industry averages, your competitors’ numbers, or your own historical data. Many marketing automation tools allow B2B marketers to track social activity on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook, and benchmark their own activity against their competitors’ doings. The key here, as with benchmarking metrics, is not to confuse social media success with bottom-line impact. It’s one thing to celebrate a record number of Twitter followers; it’s quite another to demonstrate just how those followers convert into leads, opportunities, and revenue for a B2B organization.

  • Lead Source Metrics

Some marketing automation tools allow companies to create complicated, multiple-attribution systems to decide which campaigns actually generate prospects. For most companies, however, simpler single-attribution systems work just fine.

Single attribution – deciding, for example, whether a new prospect was recruited via an email campaign or direct mail effort – allows you to do some relatively simple calculations for the investment required per prospect. That, in turn, allows you to calculate the ROI for your campaigns.

  • Database and Data-Quality Metrics

Data quality issues are a growing problem for marketing organizations, as databases with outdated or inaccurate records tend to increase costs and drive down campaign ROI. Tracking metrics such as database size, average lead age, and performance by database/list source can tell you whether there are potentially serious data quality problems lurking in your marketing database.

The Payoff of Marketing Measurement

Most marketers know that metrics are important, and they already attempt to track at least some of the data points discussed here. The real payoff, however, comes when a B2B marketing organization learns how to automate its data-collection process and to present this data to tell a coherent story about its contributions.

Marketing automation offers tools to identify, track, and analyze key metrics, allowing marketers to spend their valuable time on tasks other than spreadsheets and other manual tracking methods.

Marketing metrics are still a work in progress and an always-moving target for even the most successful companies. As a result, it’s important for any marketing team to experiment with its own metrics and test new approaches. But for today’s B2B marketing organizations, it’s clear that effective measurement is a tool you can’t afford to work without.

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Act-On Blog

Measure and Magnify Your Impact with Usage Metrics for Dashboard and Report Authors

Power BI makes it easy to deliver valuable insights across your organization. We’ve heard many stories from customers who’ve made a tremendous impact by publishing content that became critical to every day decision making. But sometimes it has been hard to precisely quantify the impact and understand what data is being used, by whom, and for what purpose.

Today, I am excited to announce the availability of usage metrics in the Power BI service for dashboard and report authors. This feature gives you one-click access to key usage metrics for your dashboards and reports, allowing you to pinpoint how your end users are interacting with your content. We hope these metrics can help you justify your investments and prioritize your efforts on the most impactful, widely used content.

Getting started

It’s easy to start taking advantage of usage metrics. Simply navigate to any dashboard or report that you have edit permissions to. From there, select the new “Usage metrics” option at the top right.

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Note: a Power BI Pro license is required to access the usage metrics reports

You’ll be presented with a pre-built report which shows the usage metrics for that dashboard or report over the last 90 days. You will see, for example, the number of views and viewers on your content, and how those numbers stack up compared to other dashboard/reports in your organization. You’ll be able to slice based on how your end users received access, whether they were accessing via the web or mobile app, etc. As your dashboards and reports evolve, so too will the usage metrics report, which updates every day with new data.

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Usage metrics will be a powerful ally as you work to deploy and maintain Power BI dashboards and reports. Wondering which pages on your report are most useful, and which ones you should phase out? Slice by report page to find out. Wondering if you should build a mobile layout for your dashboard? The usage metrics report will inform you how many users are accessing your content via the mobile apps vs. via web browser.

Tip: usage metrics are presented as a pre-built report, so you can pin any of the report visuals to a dashboard, to monitor them more easily or share usage with others.

To get even more out of usage metrics, you can use the “save as” feature to create a copy of the pre-built usage metrics.

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Once you’ve created a copy, you’ll get full access to the underlying dataset, allowing you to fully customize the usage metrics report to your specific needs. You can even use Power BI Desktop to build custom usage metrics reports using the live connection to Power BI service feature.

Better yet, the underlying dataset includes the usage details for all dashboards or reports in the workspace. This opens up yet another world of possibilities. You could, for example, create a report which compares all dashboards in your workspace based on usage. Or, you could create a usage metrics dashboard for your Power BI app by aggregating usage across all the content distributed within that app.

Next steps

Content creator usage metrics are now broadly available, so go forth and explore! We’re excited to see how you’ll magnify your impact with this feature.

  • For further information, be sure to check out the usage metrics documentation
  • Have comments? Want to share a cool use case for the feature? We’d love to hear it! Please leave comments below, or in the community forums
  • Have ideas for where we should take the feature? Create new ideas or vote on existing ones in UserVoice

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Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI

When I was still with Microsoft, as part of the giving campaign, we volunteered to help at a Habitat for Humanity construction site. The site was very close to my home and it ended up being a fun outing for everyone. We worked together on various oddball projects around the construction site. Granted, what we did was fairly basic work – but it felt like we contributed our small piece. That was several years ago. Since then the community has been fully built.

image thumb 13 Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI
During Construction and After Completion, a Habitat for Humanity Project

Each time I pass this community, I feel a sense of pride. My chest swells up a little bit. And if there is someone there with me, I thump my chest and say, “You know, I built that!”. Okay, I don’t actually say that, not out loud at least.

But why is it like that? Why does this house evoke that much emotion in me? When I daily pass by numerous communities, some far grander than this one, hardly noticing them at all. Because, in a small way, I helped to shape it.

The first Power BI idea that I submitted and earnestly gathered support for was “Analyze in Excel”.

image 19 Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI

We were delighted when that feature was announced at Data Insights Summit in March 2016. And since then Analyze in Excel remains one of those “WOW” features that we love to showcase to any client.

But I also had mixed feelings for the whole endeavor, since I felt – “Gosh, is that what I need to do to get a feature into Power BI? Get 2000+ votes”.
But the other day I got notification for a small little idea that I had submitted, that it was completed.

image 21 Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI

That new feature is called – Query Dependency View. More on that below. But folks, Power BI team is listening to you. This is our chance to shape perhaps the BI tool for the 21st century. So you can later say…

“I built that!”

lego 1696427 960 720 Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BIIf you are anything like me, you treat Queries like lego blocks. I build simple modules and then combine them to get the end result that I need. I am always afraid of looking at a 100+ step Query. Instead I prefer breaking out the logic in small pieces and building things step by step. For instance a current production model of mine has 60 Queries (most of them are connection only, i.e. building blocks).

And now you have a phenomenal way to visualize all your queries and how they connect to each other, using the Query Dependency View in Power BI. See the animated GIF below, but our Australian friend has an excellent blog post with more detail.

p.s. : Excel Users can still enjoy the Query Dependency view by simply importing their models into Power BI Desktop.

Query Dependency Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI
Animated GIF showing the wonders of Query Dependency View

Matt has his list, but while we’re on the topic, here are the improvements that I would like to see:-

  • Hover Over Display: As I hover over tables, it would be great to see the comment that user entered in the “All Properties” box for that query
  • Show Descriptive Statistics: This may be displayed on demand, there could be a button, when clicked would show descriptive statistics – like the RowCount of each Query. Those who have seen SSIS would know what I am requesting. I think Alteryx has this in some fashion as well.
  • Hover over and select arrows: Sometimes it’s hard to trace an arrow back and forth between it’s source and destination. If hovering or selecting an arrow would highlight both Source and Destination, that would be useful
  • Save High Quality JPEG: I can already imagine poster-sized printouts of Query Dependency View hanging outside people’s wall. You can’t get better advertisement than that! Unfortunately taking screenshot doesn’t quite cut it for me, since I have too many queries. But if the View would allow me to save a Hi-Def image that I could print using a plotter, that’s going straight to my cubicle wall!

While I have 60 Queries in the model I mentioned, I have 200+ measures. And I build my measures in the same lego block fashion. I have in fact attempted to build a dependency tree myself. However, it ends up being quite a lot of heavy lifting; and it doesn’t look nearly as good as what I know Power BI team can build. Here are my attempts:-

image thumb 15 Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI
Using NodeXL in Excel (this was the my preferred view but clunky to build and use)

MeasureDependecny PowerBI Views Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI
Using Custom Visuals in Power BI (click to enlarge)

Wouldn’t it be better to have something like this:

Vote for the idea here.

Power On!
– Avi Singh
LinkedIn Twitter

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PowerPivotPro

Improving the Measure Grid in SSDT Tabular

As the name implies, the measure grid is an SSDT Tabular feature to define and manage measures, as illustrated in the following screenshot. It is available for each table when you work in Data View in Tabular Model Designer. You can toggle it on and off by using the Show Measure Grid option on the Table menu.

oldmg Improving the Measure Grid in SSDT Tabular

The measure grid is not without shortcomings and receives a fair share of customer feedback. Among other things, drag-and-drop or copy-and-paste operations are currently not supported. It is also hard to locate the measure you want if your table has many measures because the grid does not sort the measures alphabetically and clips their names if the cell size is too small, which it usually is. You can increase the cell widths, but that also increases the widths of the table columns above, which is not great either. You can see the effect in the previous screenshot.

Tabular Model Explorer (TME), introduced with the August release of SSDT, helps to alleviate some of these shortcomings because TME displays all metadata objects in a sortable treeview, including measures and KPIs. We are also planning to add drag-and-drop as well as copy-and-paste operations in a future release. The measure grid, on the other hand, might not see the same improvements because we are considering to replace it in the midterm. In the meantime, however, we do want to address your valuable feedback. So, the October release of SSDT Tabular includes some very targeted improvements to deliver a more user-friendly measure grid experience. Check out the screenshot below. As you can see, the grid now adjusts the cell height and cell width automatically to avoid clipping the measure names, thus making it easier to navigate through the measures without affecting the widths of the table columns above too much.

newmg 1024x707 Improving the Measure Grid in SSDT Tabular

Of course, this is only a small improvement, but the big question is if you’d like us to continue improving the measure grid or if you’d rather want us to replace it with a completely different and hopefully better alternative? Please don’t hesitate to let us know. We want to guide our investments in SSDT Tabular based on what will help you be the most productive and help you deliver great solutions to your customers. While it will take some time to deliver on all of the feedback and feature requests, we will make updates each month and work against the backlog in the order of priority based on your input. Your feedback is essential for making SSDT Tabular better — be it for new features, existing features, or entirely missing capabilities. So send us your suggestions on UserVoice or MSDN forums and influence the evolution of SSDT Tabular to the benefit of all our customers. Thank you in advance for taking the time to provide input and stay tuned for the upcoming monthly releases of SSDT Tabular with even more exciting improvements!

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Analysis Services and PowerPivot Team Blog

Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI

When I was still with Microsoft, as part of the giving campaign, we volunteered to help at a Habitat for Humanity construction site. The site was very close to my home and it ended up being a fun outing for everyone. We worked together on various oddball projects around the construction site. Granted, what we did was fairly basic work – but it felt like we contributed our small piece. That was several years ago. Since then the community has been fully built.

image thumb 13 Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI
During Construction and After Completion, a Habitat for Humanity Project

Each time I pass this community, I feel a sense of pride. My chest swells up a little bit. And if there is someone there with me, I thump my chest and say, “You know, I built that!”. Okay, I don’t actually say that, not out loud at least.

But why is it like that? Why does this house evoke that much emotion in me? When I daily pass by numerous communities, some far grander than this one, hardly noticing them at all. Because, in a small way, I helped to shape it.

The first Power BI idea that I submitted and earnestly gathered support for was “Analyze in Excel”.

image 19 Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI

We were delighted when that feature was announced at Data Insights Summit in March 2016. And since then Analyze in Excel remains one of those “WOW” features that we love to showcase to any client.

But I also had mixed feelings for the whole endeavor, since I felt – “Gosh, is that what I need to do to get a feature into Power BI? Get 2000+ votes”.
But the other day I got notification for a small little idea that I had submitted, that it was completed.

image 21 Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI

That new feature is called – Query Dependency View. More on that below. But folks, Power BI team is listening to you. This is our chance to shape perhaps the BI tool for the 21st century. So you can later say…

“I built that!”

lego 1696427 960 720 Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BIIf you are anything like me, you treat Queries like lego blocks. I build simple modules and then combine them to get the end result that I need. I am always afraid of looking at a 100+ step Query. Instead I prefer breaking out the logic in small pieces and building things step by step. For instance a current production model of mine has 60 Queries (most of them are connection only, i.e. building blocks).

And now you have a phenomenal way to visualize all your queries and how they connect to each other, using the Query Dependency View in Power BI. See the animated GIF below, but our Australian friend has an excellent blog post with more detail.

p.s. : Excel Users can still enjoy the Query Dependency view by simply importing their models into Power BI Desktop.

Query Dependency Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI
Animated GIF showing the wonders of Query Dependency View

Matt has his list, but while we’re on the topic, here are the improvements that I would like to see:-

  • Hover Over Display: As I hover over tables, it would be great to see the comment that user entered in the “All Properties” box for that query
  • Show Descriptive Statistics: This may be displayed on demand, there could be a button, when clicked would show descriptive statistics – like the RowCount of each Query. Those who have seen SSIS would know what I am requesting. I think Alteryx has this in some fashion as well.
  • Hover over and select arrows: Sometimes it’s hard to trace an arrow back and forth between it’s source and destination. If hovering or selecting an arrow would highlight both Source and Destination, that would be useful
  • Save High Quality JPEG: I can already imagine poster-sized printouts of Query Dependency View hanging outside people’s wall. You can’t get better advertisement than that! Unfortunately taking screenshot doesn’t quite cut it for me, since I have too many queries. But if the View would allow me to save a Hi-Def image that I could print using a plotter, that’s going straight to my cubicle wall!

While I have 60 Queries in the model I mentioned, I have 200+ measures. And I build my measures in the same lego block fashion. I have in fact attempted to build a dependency tree myself. However, it ends up being quite a lot of heavy lifting; and it doesn’t look nearly as good as what I know Power BI team can build. Here are my attempts:-

image thumb 15 Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI
Using NodeXL in Excel (this was the my preferred view but clunky to build and use)

MeasureDependecny PowerBI Views Power BI Measure Dependency View–Help Shape the Future of Power BI
Using Custom Visuals in Power BI (click to enlarge)

Wouldn’t it be better to have something like this:

Vote for the idea here.

Power On!
– Avi Singh
LinkedIn Twitter

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

PowerPivotPro

Can’t Measure Your Marketing ROI? There Might Be A Solution

Do you find it difficult to measure and quantify your marketing ROI? You’re not alone. According to a global survey conducted by the programmatic marketing and analytics firm DataXu, this is the greatest challenge marketers currently face.

Over two-thirds of marketers surveyed say developing a deeper understanding of marketing technologies is critical to their marketing ROI and success. A full 65% of marketers believe being data literate is a particularly important skill to have in today’s digital world.

According to 41% of global marketers and 37% of U.S. marketers, the biggest challenge facing their organizations is developing an efficient marketing mix across channels and platforms to deliver the best marketing ROI possible.

Difficulty in quantifying marketing ROI

But a common roadblock they face in doing so is poor visibility into their metrics to identify what is working and isn’t, making it extremely difficult to measure the effectiveness of each channel. Some of the marketers surveyed attributed this challenge to the number of marketing technology platforms and vendors they need to manage. For many, they are working with 10 or more platforms and vendors across the martech landscape, which makes it difficult for marketers to get a unified measurement.

The president and CEO of DataXu, Mike Baker, also thinks the measurement problem is caused by the “walled gardens” many companies have built around their channels. Digital platforms like Facebook and Google may be able to offer marketers better customer insights into how their marketing is performing within each walled garden, but the problem for marketers is that these platforms cannot measure one another.

Without a unified measurement across these different walled gardens, marketers do not have a way to effectively measure and compare their marketing investment and ROI.

How experimental design can help marketers

In order to combat this fragmented consumer view and measurement challenge, some companies like Vodafone are trying out an approach called “experimental design.”

As Vodafone’s head of brand strategy David Still explains, if you want to prove whether something works or not, you test it out by taking it away. If it really works the way you think it does, you will see the effect when it’s gone. And this is what experimental design can help marketers find out, according to Still and Baker.

Baker describes experimental design as a series of “continuous experiments where media volumes and types of investments are continuously varied,” allowing marketers to measure and understand which investment has a “causal relationship” with sales.

It’s similar to the concept of A/B testing, Baker says. Media plans are more complex, however, since marketers are dealing with dozens of variables. So how one can look at experimental design is that it is a real-time, continuous multi-variant test. It provides marketers a more scientific and rigorous approach to measuring and identifying which media investment is generating sales and driving business outcomes.

Vodafone, for example, has applied experimental design to its marketing efforts by taking different parts of the country and investing various levels of marketing spend across different media channels, then comparing them to other areas where spend is kept at constant.  And through experimental design, what Vodafone found out was that, for their brand, television was still a very important channel for the business.

With key insights like this into its marketing ROI, Vodafone was able to better optimize its marketing spend to focus on efforts like television that drove most sales, while improving its efficiency by 10%.

Experimental design requires a change of mindset

Experimental design ultimately is about testing and learning from your successes and failures. For Still, experimental design isn’t just another marketing program about better marketing planning or ROI. It’s a change of mindset, moving from one consistent way of doing and thinking about marketing to trying something different. It’s about taking risks and being open to experimentation and failures.

But through continuous experiments and smart mistakes, marketers can gain a deeper understanding of how each media channel works in isolation and combination and find out what the optimal spend is for each channel to drive the greatest marketing ROI.

Still says that adopting such an approach won’t be easy for all brands. For some, the process can be extremely labor-intensive in both getting stakeholders on board with the approach and getting it set up. But for Still, all the hard work is worth it because you’re trading short-term pain for long-term gain.

It used to be that social media was under the marketing department’s umbrella, but that’s not the case today. In a Live Business, Social Gets Its MBA.

Retail Forum 2016 728 x 280 Can’t Measure Your Marketing ROI? There Might Be A Solution

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Digitalist Magazine

find the measure of $a,b,c,d,e,f,g$ and $h$

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if $ \frac{1}{ab}+\frac{c}{de}+\frac{f}{gh}=1$ and they are different numbers between one and ten then find the measure of $ a,b,c,d,e,f,g$ and $ h$ .

My Attempt:I find these answers with guessing.I know there isn’t any way to find the answers without guessing but I want an easy guess system that the answer can found under 5 minutes.These are my answers:

$ a=3$ ,$ b=6$ ,$ c=5$ ,$ d=9$ ,$ e=8$ ,$ f=7$ ,$ g=2$ ,$ h=4$

note:We cannot use 1 or 10.

Recent Questions – Mathematica Stack Exchange

Rethinking How You Measure Sender Reputation

Among the points he made was that in the beginning of the email industry, when ISPs behaved roughly the same, a single score had meaning. But the industry evolved, and each ISP evolved in its own direction, and the single score became less meaningful. As a deliverability analyst, I am largely in agreement with Kevin. I never let my clients get hung up on the score, even when it’s so low that you would think no email could be delivered. There are two main reasons why the scoring system has little to no bearing on today’s deliverability.

  • The score is primarily based on a subscriber panel, which is mainly made up of B2C email addresses, that will never accurately represent the reality of your marketing list.
  • Most major ISPs use their own algorithms and reputation system to determine delivery and inbox placement.

The world of deliverability doesn’t have to wait for Sender Score to fall completely before setting new standards for itself. To expand on Kevin’s points, an increasing number of reputation services by individual ISPs already exist and have risen as alternatives, providing a more direct and accurate way of helping you understand your true performance. Here’s a list of publicly accessible services offered by a few of the major ISPs everyone can leverage to stay ahead of the game.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

Act-On Marketing Blog

How to Perform a Social Media Audit: Measure What Matters

Social media is long past the novelty stage. It’s a critical part of your content strategy, and like the other tactics you use, it needs to be monitored and measured so you can spend your time and money wisely, while getting the best return you can.

Before we dive into how to do that, let’s take a quick snapshot of the latest social media stats:

  • 3 billion people are active Internet users. That’s almost half the world’s population.
  • There are slightly over 2 billion social accounts.
global digital snapshot How to Perform a Social Media Audit: Measure What Matters

This graphic is from Wearever’s Compendium of research into the digital, social, and mobile state of the world (a mind-boggling 376 slides’ worth of data)

Statistica tells us that 73% of US Americans had a social network profile in 2015. And as far back as 2013, Forrester analyst Zachary Reiss-Davis concluded that “everybody uses social media for work.”

Social media has also begun to be a noteworthy driver of website traffic. Depending on who you read, social is responsible for 31% of website traffic… or 5% of it.

So if you’re an active content marketer, you’re probably using one or more social media channels.

Do you know how well your social media is working? 

It’s one thing to feel like your social media is working; it’s another to know for sure.

You can’t rely on other people’s numbers to light your way (or convince your boss when she’s determining the budget for next quarter). Studies done on other industries or on self-selecting groups may not apply to you even a little bit, and could be misleading.

The good news is, you can rely on your own numbers, once you get them, and they aren’t that hard to get. Start by doing your first social media audit, then rinse and repeat on a schedule.

What is a “Social Media Audit?”

A social media audit is a review and examination of the total social media presence of a person or organization. This means studying social media profiles, content, posts, posting times, and audience engagement for strengths and weaknesses. The goal of this review is to gather the data that will give you benchmarks, and from there you’ll have insight into how you can optimize your return on investment, and improve performance of the social media channels that deliver the best returns.

Auditing your social media begins with identifying the channels that produce your best gains. Analyzing these can help you figure out what to do to boost your social referral traffic and also shed light on your audience’s tastes. These insights can help you build a better, higher-converting overall content strategy that connects deeply with your target demographic.

Linking social media efforts directly to web traffic is a metric you might consider tracking. Using technology that allows the capture and attribution of leads can take you beyond total traffic and engagement (which are good) and tie those visits and interactions to real sales dollars (which is even better).

First, know your customers

Before you can dive in to evaluate content and interactions on your different social channels, make sure that you have a deep understanding of your audience. Take a look at your best customers, the ones you want to replicate. Better yet, take a listen.

You should know the answers to these questions about your target audience:

  • Which channels are they on?
  • What topics do they respond to?
  • What do they talk about on social?
  • Which hashtags do they use?
  • What are their pains and challenges?
  • How do they interact with different types of content in general?
  • How do they interact with your competitors?
  • Do you have potential customers in different segments, concerned about different things? 

Make sure you understand your audience so you can create social content that answers their questions, piques their interest, and gets them to engage with you through likes, comments, shares, clicks, and web visits. (If you need to understand personas and segmentation better, check out this buyer personas toolkit).

Get Started with Your Audit

Setting up a social media audit can take time, but your preparation will pay off with making the actual audit better organized, so it goes more smoothly. And you’ll have a process in place to repeat the audit, so it’s an even better investment over time.

Build a spreadsheet

Create one that meets your own unique needs. Things to track might include the social media platforms you engage with, your profile names, the number of followers, possibly your last activity, etc.

This document will tally your findings, and will support your analysis once the audit is over.

Social Audit Spreadsheet How to Perform a Social Media Audit: Measure What Matters

There’s no one right way to build a spreadsheet to house the data you will accumulate. Keep things together in a way that focuses on your team’s goals and in a way that makes sense to you and your team in the long run.

Clear Understanding of KPIs and Business Goals

Start with a set of metrics you want to look at. Depending on your business, you might consider:

Metrics that show reach:

  • Likes
  • Followers
  • Views
  • Subscribers

Metrics that show engagement:

  • Shares
  • Retweets
  • Comments
  • Downloads

Metrics that show revenue:

  • Leads, opportunities and closed sales attributable to social
  • Service opportunities that retain customers

What You’ll Be Doing

Now that you understand your business goals, target audience and have a place to track the information, it’s time to take the next step in the audit process. There are some key things that you will want to review and record before you plan what adjustments are needed in your social media strategy:

Profile Checks

Go through your social media accounts and check to make sure they are consistent, on message, and completely up to date. This will typically cover items such as:

  • Profile photos and headers: Check each one to make sure they are optimized for the platform they are on. Sizes and viewable areas are important across multiple devices. Check this guide to make sure you’re ready.
  • Descriptions: A few of the key social media platforms give you limited space, so be concise.
  • Links: Make sure all the links in your profile (to your company or content) are current.
  • Company name, address, and phone number: Make sure they are all current and consistent with what’s on your website.

Content Wrangling

Take inventory of the content you’ve been sharing, and note the posts, tweets, and shares revolving around each item. Here are the areas that you should be focused on while doing so:

  • Goal of the content: What goal is this content created to achieve? How well is it working?
  • Engagement: How many people are interacting with the content? This means people who shared it, commented on it, or clicked on any associated links. This can help you identify the content that performs well, going beyond approval (e.g. likes) to engagement.
  • Impressions: How many people have viewed it?
  • Relevance: Is the content “evergreen,” meaning will it stay relevant to your audience for an extended period of time (potentially forever)? The posts you’re sharing should be using up-to-date data, and should be addressing problems and topics that are top-of-mind for your prospects.
  • Conversions: This might take a bit more searching to uncover, but with the right technology to deliver attribution insights, you can see which content is leading to real dollars for your company.

Competition Analysis

It’s critical to know what your competition is doing in your space, and how you stack up to them on social media. Take a close look at their profiles the same way that you are reviewing yours, and document their changes as well.

I won’t get into too much detail here, but there are a ton of great resources and services out there to help you analyze your competition. Here are a few to check out:

Look for weak spots and opportunities to outperform your competition.

It’s Not a One-Time Deal

Social media channels will change, your audience will evolve, and tastes will adapt over time to different tactics. Auditing your social media is a regular process that cannot just be completed and forgotten.

Depending on the frequency of your content creation, and the ferocity of your social media strategy, you could be auditing anywhere from one to four times per year. Much like the structure of your audit spreadsheet, there is no “right” answer when it comes to how often you should conduct your review.

260x200 social media audit How to Perform a Social Media Audit: Measure What MattersOk, Now Go For It!

Each social network has its own quirks. Check out our in-depth eBook “Conducting a Successful Social Media Audit” to get specific tactics for Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+ so you can do a solid audit, and fine-tune your social media for the best results. Happy auditing!



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11 Email Marketing Metrics to Measure to Win in 2015

Email marketing is an excellent platform to reach new potential customers as well as a great way to maximize existing customer engagement. But how do you measure the effectiveness of an email marketing campaign? Measurement is the key to proving success! Here are 11 email marketing metrics you should be tracking to help prove your ROI in 2015. Using email for marketing also gives valuable insights into who your audience is, which helps inform other marketing channels.

Email Metric Photo 11 Email Marketing Metrics to Measure to Win in 2015

1. Delivery Rate

This is one of the more basic metrics, but it’s sometimes misunderstood. Not everyone understands what makes a “good” delivery rate. Some companies will even make it a company goal to improve deliverability. A good delivery rate is usually somewhere around 97%. If a company tells you they can get you a 100% delivery rate, they are not being upfront and honest with you. If you’re below, say, 90%, you should dig in and solve possible underlying issues with your provider or list.

2. Bounce Rate

Tied directly to delivery rate, the bounce rate will tell you how many of the emails you sent hit an inbox that no longer exists or is full. These can also be referred to as a hard bounce or a soft bounce. While that level of granularity is appreciated, your email marketing isn’t going to benefit too much from the distinction. If you notice your bounce rate climbing, it means your delivery rate is dropping and it’s time to clean up your email lists.

3. Click-Through-Rate

Usually, click-through-rate (CTR) is one of the primary email marketing metrics that companies use to set campaign goals around. That’s because it works. With CTR, you know how many emails were delivered and you can see how many people actually took the desired action (clicking on a link for example) included within the email. It also allows you to A/B test different messaging and layouts. This is a great way to test which headlines and copy resonate most with your target audience. This can help inform most other digital channels as well.

4. Conversion Rate

Your email has been successfully delivered, you convinced the user to click, and now you need to know if they took the next step and actually bought something, which is known as Conversion. It’s crucial that you track your conversion rate from email. If you’re offering a product or service you can quickly calculate the ROI based on conversion rate. Of course, you can always set a conversion goal around something that doesn’t tie directly to revenue growth right away. Use email to massage users down the funnel on their purchase journey. As long as you have a clear goal, you can calculate conversion rate. Just make sure it has a tangible benefit!

5. Growth

The metrics we’ve already mentioned tell you how your email marketing campaign is performing, but there are even more metrics that can help you understand how the email channel is performing for your business. One metric for this is growth. It’s important to track your email list growth over time so that you know the size of your audience and how many people actually want information from you. Growth is a good indicator that the subscribers trust your brand and that the content you are creating is resonating with them.

6. Forward Rate

People open, click, and convert, but how do you figure out how many people are truly brand advocates for your company, product, or service? This is where forward rate shines as an email metric. If the messaging and offer are powerful enough that a user wants to share it with their network, you know you’ve really nailed your campaign. Plus, if you find these users, you can delight them with special offers or gifts. It’s a great way to build raving fans!

7. Unsubscribe Rate

Sometimes your email marketing efforts will annoy some subscribers. They might have mismatched expectations, think that you send too many emails, or the subscriber may have a change in behavior. All of these are valid reasons for why someone might unsubscribe from your email list. If you notice your unsubscribe rate climbing, it may be time to evaluate your messaging and distribution frequency as these are the two most common reasons for unsubscribes. However, there could be something deeper going on. The only way to know is to track your unsubscribe rate and look into it when necessary.

8. Device Type

You can learn a lot about your audience by looking at different email metrics. One such metric is device type. With the explosive growth of mobile, it’s worth exploring the percentage of users that view your email on a mobile device vs. desktop vs. tablet. For example, you may find that most of your audience favors one device type over another, which gives you an extra level of granularity for targeting other digital campaigns. You’ll also be able to A/B test different audiences and campaign types.

9. Email Client

There’s also the preferred email client, which helps you understand even more about your audience. With all of the numerous email clients out there, it’s impossible to optimize for all of them. This lets you focus on the top email clients used by your audience and work down from there, ensuring a great experience for your subscribers right from the start.

10. Leads

Most businesses look at leads, and if you’re not measuring how many of those leads come from email, you’re missing out on an opportunity to calculate your true ROI analysis. Your list, conversions, and forwards may be growing, but if you’re not generating many leads you’ll want to explore how to develop a stronger lead capture process as part of your nurturing campaigns. You might find that email seems great, but that it isn’t a channel that generates many leads for you or vice versa. Either way, you’ll know how to better allocate resources to get the results you are looking for.

11. Engagement Over Time

Measuring engagement is the ultimate email marketing metric. More valuable than leads because it applies to any business or email campaign type, engagement measures if your efforts to improve all other metrics is driving more engagement over time. If some of your metrics are going up while some are going down, you’ll see your engagement is stagnant. This might be a resource allocation issue or something deeper that might require some audience testing and targeting. Either way, you’ll see how well you are doing over time.

All of these metrics can be evaluated in most email marketing service providers, but if you use Dynamics CRM and MailChimp, PowerObjects has the perfect add-on that lets you marry the two. PowerMailChimp lets you to tie data together for deep analysis and tracking.

What are some email marketing metrics that you find helpful? Add them in the comments below! We always love to hear from our readers!

Happy CRM’ing!

 11 Email Marketing Metrics to Measure to Win in 2015

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