Tag Archives: Play

Tyler Perry To Play Colin Powell In Adam McKay’s Dick Cheney Film

TylerPerry Tyler Perry To Play Colin Powell In Adam McKay’s Dick Cheney Film

Adam McKay has set Tyler Perry to play Colin Powell in the untitled movie about former U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney for Annapurna. Powell is the four-star general who as Bush Administration Secretary of State pressed the case for the 2003 invasion of Iraq, based on intelligence that Saddam Hussein was manufacturing weapons of mass destruction. None of the weapons Powell cited in his presentation to the United Nations was recovered after Iraq was routed. Perry will costar alongside Christian Bale, who plays Cheney, Amy Adams as his wife Lynne, Sam Rockwell as George W. Bush and Steve Carell as Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld.

The film, which is being produced by Annapurna Pictures, Plan B and Gary Sanchez, is in production. Perry wrote, directed and stars in Tyler Perry’s Boo 2: A Madea Halloween, which Lionsgate releases October 20. WME reps him.

Source: Deadline

‘Survivor’s Remorse’ To End After 4 Seasons On Starz

On This Day In Comedy… In 1972 Comedienne And Actress Cocoa Brown Was Born!

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

The Humor Mill

5 of the Hottest IT Trends (and How Mainframes Play a Role)

Mainframe is not on most people’s lists of the hottest words in tech. Additionally, mainframes may seem disconnected from modern IT trends, but the latest practices and innovations are being applied to mainframes. Here’s how.

Mainframes were developed long before anyone was thinking about the trends and technologies that define modern computing. Concepts like open source software were decades away from emerging when the first mainframes were deployed in the 1950s.

blog IBM mainframe 5 of the Hottest IT Trends (and How Mainframes Play a Role)

Other modern IT trends and technologies, such as Docker, continuous delivery, and DevOps, did not emerge until more than a half-century after mainframes came into use.

Mainframes and IT Trends

But mainframes have more in common with today’s IT technologies and methodologies than you might think. Consider the following trends and platforms that are popular today and their connections to mainframes:

1. Open source

Black Duck says that the open source software model – under which software source code is freely shared – is now the “default” approach to software development at a majority of organizations. While open source’s massive popularity is a relatively recent phenomenon, open source platforms have been common on mainframes for years. Mainframe implementations of Linux have long been popular on mainframes. Other open source projects, like Hercules, offer open source clones of traditional mainframe operating systems.

blog banner BloorWP 5 of the Hottest IT Trends (and How Mainframes Play a Role)

2. Big Data

Big data analytics have become a key part of the way many organizations do business. It was only with the emergence of platforms like Hadoop and Spark that many companies began thinking about big data in a modern way.

But mainframes were being used to collect large amounts of data long before “Big Data” became a thing. (And vendors like Syncsort have long offered data integration solutions for accessing and integrating mainframe data with Hadoop data lakes and modern analytics platforms like Splunk.)

Related: What’s Trending in Big Iron to Big Data

blog big data mainframe 5 of the Hottest IT Trends (and How Mainframes Play a Role)

3. Cloud computing

Terms like cloud computing and Software-as-a-Service became popular only about a decade ago. But in a sense, mainframes were being used to build clouds decades ago  – and they are still an important part of the infrastructure that makes private clouds possible at many organizations. That’s because one of the main purposes of mainframes is to collect data and run applications that users access remotely  – the core idea behind the cloud computing model.

Related: Finding Room for the Mainframe in Your Cloud Architecture

4. Docker containers

Docker containers, which allows system administrators to run applications inside isolated containers, are revolutionizing the way applications are hosted and deployed. While there has been little discussion of running Docker on mainframes, you can and should. Docker works on any Linux-based operating system, including mainframe variants like Linux on z.

5. Continuous delivery

Most programmers today adhere to the idea that software works best when changes are written, tested and deployed on a continuous basis. This practice is known as continuous delivery. As a relatively new concept, continuous delivery may not seem like something that meshes with mainframes. But it does, as I’ve written on this site previously.

So, there you have it. If you thought your mainframes were good only for sitting in dusty corners while IT innovation happens elsewhere, think again. The trends that define modern computing today apply to mainframes as much as they do to commodity infrastructure – and, in many cases, mainframes were the places where innovations like open source and the cloud established roots before they went mainstream.

Learn more about how mainframes and Big Data trends are merging to create new opportunites. Download the Bloor Spotlight: Big Data and The Mainframe, Issues and Opportunitiestoday!

 5 of the Hottest IT Trends (and How Mainframes Play a Role)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Syncsort blog

Play time: Why you should add gamification to your content strategy

Play time Why you should add gamification to your content strategy  351x200 Play time: Why you should add gamification to your content strategy

We just wrapped up the holiday season, but we can still take some time to relax and have a little fun. To that end, today’s post is about gamification ‒ a way to play with your content and turn it into a fun and engaging experience.

Gamification in the context of content marketing

Gamification is a made-up word (as you probably guessed). The notion is to add gaming concepts to content to create an interactive experience. Gaming concepts – or gaming mechanics, as they’re often called in the industry – mean things like points, awards, and wins/losses. We’ll get into those in a moment.

Gamification is often used in the training and education world. For example, HR teams may use it to teach internal staff about new policies. Teachers definitely use it to incentivize learning.

You can use this concept in content marketing, as well. For example, you might try to “gamify” a process, tricky concept, or industry vocabulary.

Here’s a hypothetical scenario. Let’s say you’re creating a new product. It’s bound to change the industry (congratulations!). But, alas, your product is a little complicated to use and understand – at least at first. As a marketer, your goal is to get people to understand how your product works and what it can do, and, ultimately, to get them to buy it, of course.

Traditionally, you might outline how to use the product in a workflow document. Perhaps you create a pamphlet or maybe a poster to show customers how it all works, from point A to point Z. The resulting output would be a stationary document.

But with gamification, you can create a dynamic experience that has potential to further engage – and delight – your potential customers. You can still include those same how-to elements from your pamphlet or poster to teach a concept. But with gamification, you also offer a unique experience that can turn a casual customer into a lifelong fan.

Why use gamification in 2017?

Now, before I get too far, let’s talk about the elephant in the room. Gamification was trendy a few years ago and many companies – from Microsoft to Target – were trying it.

So why use gamification now? Is it old-hat? Passé?

The answer is No, and there are a few reasons why.

First, content remains top dog in the marketing world. Related to that, finding new ways to share your content – or reuse it – will always be in style.

And gaming is (still) having a huge moment. As of 2015, U.S. video gaming industry revenue was $ 23B. Casual games remain popular, too. Angry Birds titles have more than 1B downloads and hundreds of millions of active monthly users, according to a Rand paper. In 2015, there were 75 million Fantasy Football players. The list goes on.

The thing is, humans are wired as competitive beasts. People will always want to play, compete – and win. Gaming, and playing, are in our blood.

So, while the “trend” of gamification may be a few years old, the backbone of it – competition and play – remains relevant.

Benefits of gamification

As I just alluded to, gamification appeals to a primal instinct in humankind: competition. By adjusting the way content is presented and introducing gaming elements, you can educate your audience while appealing to their competitive side. There are a couple other big benefits of gamifying, too:

  • Engaging customers

With a gamification effort, you’re creating not just a deliverable, but an experience. A memorable, hopefully unforgettable experience. I read a book several years ago called “Made to Stick.” The notion is finding “sticky concepts” ‒ those hooky, unique ideas that make customers take note of your brand. Done well, gamification can be one of those sticky ideas. With gamification, you engage them, delight them, and hook them.

  • Time on site translates to customer loyalty

Furthermore, a gamification effort can garner a key metric, too: time on your website. If done well, that’s time well spent. It’s time that your customers – or potential customers – pause other activity and devote minutes or hours to your brand. Invest in it. It’s time they can fall in love with your product and brand.

Gamification can be used to “move customers through different loyalty levels.” A great gamification effort stirs emotion, evokes interest, and encourages long-term brand love. If done well, a gamification effort can turn players into customers and even advocates.

Elements of a gamification effort

So, I’ve spent a lot of time waxing poetic about theories. Let’s get tactical. If you do want to create a gamification effort for your content, there are elements that you need to include.

  • Goals: Set at least one. What is the point of your game? Are you trying to train customers how to use your product? Do you want to teach them concepts or vocabulary – such as the names of all of your products ‒ so that these become engrained in their casual conversations?
  • Scoring: There must be a way for players to know how they are tracking against the goal. A common tactic is to award points for completion (or partial completion), and keep score. Then, show those results on a scoreboard – often called a “leaderboard” in the gamification industry.
  • Winners: Not only must you keep score, but also ensure that you incorporate the concept of winning. This can be winning a round, winning the game, or winning a prize. Remember, you can win a game against other players, or even yourself (think Solitaire).You may also incorporate the concept of losing, but that is less of a positive approach. Keep it to winning, and players will understand what a non-win means but won’t be discouraged.
  • Rewards: We all like to receive rewards for a job well done, whether it’s a sticker like the ones you used to get in school for an A on a spelling test or that latte you treat yourself to after a trip to the dentist (surely it’s not just me who does this?). So keep your eye on those prizes. In terms of gamification, a prize could be a tangible thing like points that accrue and can be traded in for actual prizes. It can also be “cloud” prizes, like bragging rights for being at the top of the leaderboard.
  • Time: A ticking timer elicits a little pressure and fuels competition. That’s why many games – from board games to video games – have one of these devices. For gamification projects, I’ve found a 15 to 30-second timer works well for each question or task. Any more than that and it becomes too easy, unless the question itself is very complex.
  • Levels: Some would argue that this is required, but I don’t necessarily agree. A single-level gaming experience can be fun and effective. More levels might cost more money to develop, too. That said, if you really want to go after that time-on-site metric, you will want to build in multiple levels or challenges to keep players playing.
  • Addictive traits: This one is potentially touchy, but hear me out. What I mean is you need to give people a reason to want to keep playing. This doesn’t have to be manipulative, like using subliminal messaging. It can be as simple as inserting a “Try again?” question screen at the end of the round. Make it easy for them to keep playing, and they will.
  • Fun! Please don’t forget this. A gamification effort shouldn’t be a slog. It shouldn’t be boring, nor feel like work. It should be entertaining. The concepts can be challenging, but the experience should be light. It should be easy and unfussy to understand and play.

“If you distract workers with the idea that they are playing the game, they don’t challenge the rules of the game,” says the New York Times. Makes sense, right? After all, the old adage is “time flies when you’re having fun.”

Assembling a game: Think like an instructional designer

Many educational institutions employ “instructional designers” ‒ people who fill a role that is part teacher, part psychologist, and part construction worker. They understand content, the way human minds work, and how concepts should be outlined and presented for effective consumption. They build these blocks together to create effective tests, courses, and curriculums.

It’s important that you think like an instructional designer as you develop a gamification effort. Or, hire someone who has this skillset.

In order to successfully create an effective and logical game, you need to move into the educational mindset. For example, you should consider the order in which your content is presented. This is not a hodgepodge, but a journey. A curriculum, even.

Think about the style, too. Not just the color and aesthetic, but the layout of the actual game content. If you want to create a quizzing-style game, would it be better to have multiple choice answers, or use a matching method?

You need to make sure the answer pool is deep enough, too. Nothing is worse than the same “wrong” answers appearing over and over. That doesn’t teach anything other than process of elimination.

Final thoughts: Gamification best practices

  • Keep it simple. Like most things, the simpler, the better. Don’t let your game take too much time to explain or try to test too many concepts at once. Stay focused.
  • Eliminate ambiguity. As you’re writing your questions and answers, think like “Jeopardy” host Alex Trebek or the writers of Trivial Pursuit. Make sure your questions are clear, with no gray area. Otherwise, you’ll cause confusion and frustrate your audience.
  • Make sure you can measure results. I probably sound like a broken record by now, because I always talk about data, but I cannot stress enough that you need to have some way to measure your results. Call it ROI, call it metrics, or even call it “before and after” ‒ just make sure you can tell if your effort had an effect. For example, do players show increased competence in concepts after playing your game? Find a way to test that, and keep measuring it. This can help you convince your boss to keep a budget line-item for gamification in the future.

So, what might you create? As you’re putting together your plans for the year ahead, consider adding this playful channel to the mix.

This article passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Act-On Marketing Action Blog

Mobilizing Your Mainframe: How to Make Mainframes Play Nicely with Mobile Apps

On the surface, mobile apps and mainframes may seem to inhabit totally opposite ends of the computing universe. Mainframes trace their origins to the earliest computers. In contrast, mobile devices represent a much newer, flashier type of infrastructure.

Yet the reality is that mobile needs mainframes. You can’t make the most out of mobile infrastructure and apps unless you integrate them effectively with your mainframe systems.

Below, I explain why integrating mobile and mainframe is so important, what makes it challenging, and how to overcome those hurdles.

Mobile and mainframe: Match made in heaven

Again, when you think of mobile devices, mainframe computers may be the last thing that comes to mind. Most mobile apps today are hosted on commodity servers or in public clouds designed to cater to mobile developers, such as AWS Mobile Services and Google Cloud Mobile Solutions.

blog ewatch Mobilizing Your Mainframe: How to Make Mainframes Play Nicely with Mobile Apps

Yet that approach to mobile app hosting is the way of the past, not the future. While the existing paradigm for building mobile infrastructure is not likely to go away anytime soon, mainframes are becoming a larger part of it.

That trend only makes sense. Mainframes host vast quantities of some of the most important data for creating mobile apps. For example, banking transactions, airline reservations, and payroll information – all of which you are likely to find hosted on a mainframe – are obvious foundations for building mobile apps that will be highly valuable to users.

Mobile-on-mainframe challenges

If that’s the case, why haven’t mobile apps been integrated more tightly with mainframe systems since the dawn of the mobile age?

The main reason is that integrating mobile devices and apps with mainframe systems is, well, hard. You have to deal with three big challenges:

  • Mobile devices are intermittently connected. You can’t count on network connections to be constantly available in the way you can with traditional Internet-connected infrastructure.
  • Mobile devices have minimal processing power. Doing the “thinking” on the server side is especially important when you are dealing with mobile apps, since the devices themselves tend to have relatively little in the way of memory and compute resources.
  • Mobile devices raise special security challenges. In most cases, mobile devices can’t be protected behind firewalls or locked down by system administrators. Allowing them to connect to your infrastructure is therefore especially risky in certain ways.

These challenges help explain why, to date, commodity servers and the public cloud have remained the hosting environments of choice for most mobile apps.

Making mainframe mobile-friendly

But that’s changing. As noted above, there are good reasons to want to integrate mobile apps with your mainframes, in order to make mainframe data easily accessible to mobile users.

blog searchphone Mobilizing Your Mainframe: How to Make Mainframes Play Nicely with Mobile Apps

How do you do that? There are two basic approaches. The first is heralded by IBM’s MobileFirst initiative, which the company announced in 2013. MobileFirst is designed to simplify the process of developing mobile apps that integrate with mainframe systems. It allows mobile developers to build mobile apps directly on mainframe systems using HTML or native programming languages.

That approach has some drawbacks, however. For one, you’re limited to the development frameworks that MobileFirst supports. For another, you are allowing mobile apps to connect directly to your mainframes. While MobileFirst is designed for tight security, a security-obsessed admin might prefer to place a barrier between the mainframes and the mobile apps that leverage their data.

Another approach to integrating mobile apps with mainframes is to rely on data offloading. This way, mobile apps can take advantage of mainframe systems, but without exposing mainframes to so many security risks or constraining development frameworks to those available on the mainframes themselves.

Under this model, solutions like Syncsort’s mainframe data access and integration software allows mobile developers to stream mainframe data into traditional environments that host mobile apps. That way, you can write your mobile app in whichever language you want and run it on commodity hardware, while still accessing all of your mainframe data quickly.

ZPSaver Suite is also valuable in supporting integration of mainframes with mobile apps. In the mobile world, compute operations need to happen very quickly. And as noted above, you can’t count on low-power mobile devices themselves to do the number crunching. By enabling ultra-fast mainframe performance, ZPSaver Suite allows mobile apps to gain access to the mainframe data they need without waiting.

These represent only a couple of the mainframe data access and integration and performance enhancement tools that mobile developers can use to build better apps.

You can learn about Syncsort’s new mainframe performance optimization tools for IBM DB2 (acquired from Cogito) on their webpage: “Syncsort EZ-DB2 Goes Beyond Traditional DB2 Tuning Tools”

 Mobilizing Your Mainframe: How to Make Mainframes Play Nicely with Mobile Apps

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Syncsort blog

The CRM Minute: Getting Sales and Marketing to Play Nice with Dynamics CRM [VIDEO]

CRM Min Data Still 800x600 300x225 The CRM Minute: Getting Sales and Marketing to Play Nice with Dynamics CRM [VIDEO]

In some organizations, there is a “sibling rivalry” between sales and marketing teams. In most cases, this stems from a lack of transparency between teams and their objectives. So what do you do? One solution is to use Dynamics CRM and marketing automation to gather and report data about individual marketing campaigns, lead funnel, and more! Hear from Chris, our PowerObjects Data Dude, as he talks about how to get sales and marketing to play nice!

We all know that Dynamics CRM is a rock star, but how do you get started with the marketing automation component that Chris discussed? Let us be your guide! Join us starting tomorrow for our Getting Started with Marketing Automation and CRM webinar series. In this three-part series, we’ll be giving you our take on the topic. We’ll define marketing automation, show you how to implement it within Microsoft Dynamics CRM, and address how marketing automation should fit into your overall digital marketing strategy. Register now for one or all of the great sessions!

WHY YOU SHOULD BE USING MARKETING AUOTMATION IN YOUR MARKETING STRATEGY

In part one of our series, we will introduce the concept of Marketing Automation and show you why you should be using it in your overall marketing strategy as well as using CRM in the process.

Speaker: Jeff Wedren, PowerObjects Director of Marketing

REGISTER NOW

LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR USING DYNAMICS CRM FOR MARKETING AUTOMATION

In part two of our series, we will give a high-level overview into how CRM and Marketing Automation are connected and how you get started implementing basic automations, things to consider, and more!

Speaker: Dean Jones, SVP

REGISTER NOW

INTRODUCING POWERNURTURE: A MARKETING AUTOMATION DREAM COME TRUE

In the final installment of our series, we highlight PowerNurture, a PowerPack add-on for Dynamics CRM designed to create and execute drip campaigns in CRM.

Speaker: Lindsey Stadsklev, PowerPack Pro

REGISTER NOW

BONUS WEBINAR: HOW POWEROBJECTS USES MICROSOFT DYNAMICS CRM FOR LEAD GEN

Are your sales and marketing teams stuck in individual silos? At PowerObjects, we use Microsoft Dynamics CRM to join our teams with one goal: Lead Generation. In this webinar you will learn how PowerObjects uses their PowerPack Add-ons and Dynamics CRM to help marketing nurture our leads to sales-ready.

Speaker: Chris Baldock, Digital Marketing Data Analyst

REGISTER NOW

Can’t make the webinars? No problem! A recording of this webinar will be published on our website for anyone who can’t attend. Register for the webinar and we’ll send you a follow-up email with a link to the recorded presentation. That way you can watch it when it’s convenient for you! Thanks for watching today’s episode!

Happy CRM’ing!

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

PowerObjects- Bringing Focus to Dynamics CRM

The CRM Minute: Getting Sales and Marketing to Play Nice with Dynamics CRM [VIDEO]

CRM Min Data Still 800x600 300x225 The CRM Minute: Getting Sales and Marketing to Play Nice with Dynamics CRM [VIDEO]

In some organizations, there is a “sibling rivalry” between sales and marketing teams. In most cases, this stems from a lack of transparency between teams and their objectives. So what do you do? One solution is to use Dynamics CRM and marketing automation to gather and report data about individual marketing campaigns, lead funnel, and more! Hear from Chris, our PowerObjects Data Dude, as he talks about how to get sales and marketing to play nice!

We all know that Dynamics CRM is a rock star, but how do you get started with the marketing automation component that Chris discussed? Let us be your guide! Join us starting tomorrow for our Getting Started with Marketing Automation and CRM webinar series. In this three-part series, we’ll be giving you our take on the topic. We’ll define marketing automation, show you how to implement it within Microsoft Dynamics CRM, and address how marketing automation should fit into your overall digital marketing strategy. Register now for one or all of the great sessions!

WHY YOU SHOULD BE USING MARKETING AUOTMATION IN YOUR MARKETING STRATEGY

In part one of our series, we will introduce the concept of Marketing Automation and show you why you should be using it in your overall marketing strategy as well as using CRM in the process.

Speaker: Jeff Wedren, PowerObjects Director of Marketing

REGISTER NOW

LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR USING DYNAMICS CRM FOR MARKETING AUTOMATION

In part two of our series, we will give a high-level overview into how CRM and Marketing Automation are connected and how you get started implementing basic automations, things to consider, and more!

Speaker: Dean Jones, SVP

REGISTER NOW

INTRODUCING POWERNURTURE: A MARKETING AUTOMATION DREAM COME TRUE

In the final installment of our series, we highlight PowerNurture, a PowerPack add-on for Dynamics CRM designed to create and execute drip campaigns in CRM.

Speaker: Lindsey Stadsklev, PowerPack Pro

REGISTER NOW

BONUS WEBINAR: HOW POWEROBJECTS USES MICROSOFT DYNAMICS CRM FOR LEAD GEN

Are your sales and marketing teams stuck in individual silos? At PowerObjects, we use Microsoft Dynamics CRM to join our teams with one goal: Lead Generation. In this webinar you will learn how PowerObjects uses their PowerPack Add-ons and Dynamics CRM to help marketing nurture our leads to sales-ready.

Speaker: Chris Baldock, Digital Marketing Data Analyst

REGISTER NOW

Can’t make the webinars? No problem! A recording of this webinar will be published on our website for anyone who can’t attend. Register for the webinar and we’ll send you a follow-up email with a link to the recorded presentation. That way you can watch it when it’s convenient for you! Thanks for watching today’s episode!

Happy CRM’ing!

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

PowerObjects- Bringing Focus to Dynamics CRM

Apple's Didi Play Is Less About China And More About Cars

During the late Steve Jobs’ entire tenure as chief of Apple, he never visited China. But now the company is hoping it’s not too late to the invest resources into country Jobs ignored.

Chinese ride-hailing app Didi announced an important part of its latest round financing and said that Apple will invest USD1 billion in the company. This is reportedly the largest single investment received by Didi. With this investment, Apple will become a strategic investor of Didi.

Cheng Wei, founder and chief executive officer of Didi, said that Apple’s recognition of the company is encouraging for Didi. The company will continue to make efforts to provide flexible and reliable traveling options to people and help solve traffic, environment, and employment challenges.

Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple, said that Didi represents the innovative spirit of Chinese iOS developers. He said Didi’s platform and management team are amazing and they are looking forward to supporting the long-term development of Didi.

But while it may look from the outside that this is a China-centric deal with Apple trying to appease both the Chinese government and its investors that it is taking China seriously (Apple saw stagnant China mobile growth in its last financial report), this is really a deal aimed at cars.

Specifically, self-driving cars are on Apple’s mind. And the company is looking to the future where Uber and Lyft, which has a close investment and business alliance with China’s Didi, are the global kings of providing driverless car services.

Didi’s business currently covers over 400 cities in China. It serves nearly 300 million users by completing 11 million orders on a daily basis. Imagine how that will translate to rides in Apple’s self-driving cars once it rolls those out. The problem in China, though, is rival Baidu.com, the Chinese search engine, is rumored to be nearing a commercial-grade release of its own driverless automobile too.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

ChinaWirelessNews.com

4 Ways Hadoop & Spark Can Play Nicely Together

As organizations buy into big data, a huge part of the process is selecting the tools to store, maintain, process, and analyze the data. Hadoop and Spark are often billed as an either-or scenario. Either you use one, or you use the other. However, there are reasons why you should consider using both. In many situations, they complement each other beautifully. Here is what each does and how they are different, but can often be used together as complementary tools.

1. Hadoop includes a Distributed Storage Framework, Spark Provides In-Memory Data Processing

bigstock The Elephant Calf With Eleph 114893240 4 Ways Hadoop & Spark Can Play Nicely Together
Hadoop can play nicely in a pack, but to be a complete big data solution, it needs to include its native data processing component, MapReduce, or be paired with another data processing product like Spark.

Hadoop includes HDFS, a distributed file framework, which allows you to distribute enormous collections of data across nodes within a cluster of servers. This eliminates the need for lots of custom hardware. Hadoop also indexes and tracks the data, which allows for processing and analyzing those massive data collections more efficiently and effectively. Spark does not distribute storage, it only processes the data. Hence, both Hadoop and Spark can work effectively as a big data system that combines a required distributed file system with Spark’s multi-stage, in-memory data processing.

2. Though Hadoop & Spark Work Well Together, It Isn’t Necessary to Have Both

In addition to Hadoop’s storage component (which, by the way, is called the Hadoop Distributed File System or HDFS), it offers MapReduce for processing purposes. This would eliminate the necessity for Spark, and is used this way in many big data infrastructures. Similarly, Spark can be used with a file management system other than Hadoop. But since Spark was designed to be used with Hadoop, the two are great companions. Plus, MapReduce is known for being difficult to program in. Spark is simpler and faster.

3. Spark is Faster Than MapReduce

bigstock Fireworks Display 105730844 4 Ways Hadoop & Spark Can Play Nicely Together
Spark isn’t essential for Hadoop, but if you need to work in real time, it is between ten and 100 times faster than MapReduce.

When considering a big data infrastructure, if speed is a consideration (such as when data streaming is required), Spark is faster than MapReduce. Spark can deliver near real-time analysis and Spark looks at all of the data, whereas MapReduce reads data from one cluster, performs an operation, then writes the results in a systematic method that slows the operations down considerably. Depending on the setup, Spark often performs 100 times faster than MapReduce.

4. Both Hadoop & Spark are Resilient to System Failures

Hadoop writes data to disk following each operation, making it resilient when a fault or failure occurs in the system. Spark also has a resilient design, it just works differently. Spark stores data objects in resilient distributed datasets or RDD, which are distributed across the clusters. The data might be stored in memory, or stored on the disks. RDD assures full recovery following a fault or failure. Hence, if you are using Hadoop and Spark separately, there is still a built-in resilience. Together, however, this duo makes for a sound infrastructure for big data processing and analytics.

Editor’s Note: Whether you’re working with Hadoop and/or Spark, your first job is getting your data from your existing data infrastructure into Hadoop in a usable format. This can be trickier than it sounds – especially if your data sources include mainframes. You can explore Syncsort’s Big Data solutions to see how their expertise in Hadoop, Spark, mainframes and data warehouse optimization can help.

 4 Ways Hadoop & Spark Can Play Nicely Together

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

Syncsort blog

WPC – A Day by Day Play

shutterstock 254354590 1 300x197 WPC – A Day by Day PlayFor those of you who have never attended Worldwide Partner Conference (WPC), it can sometimes feel a bit overwhelming and un-focused. It is, after all, Microsoft’s second largest event, bringing together 15,000 people from Microsoft’s entire partner ecosystem, not just Dynamics. This year was no different, and there was so much information to take in. That can be both exciting and daunting at the same time. It can easily lead to the generation of many ideas, and, if not careful, the loss of focus. Luckily, CRM Vertex is laser focused on building quality add-on products for Microsoft Dynamics to help drive better engagement.

Here’s a day by day play for those of you who weren’t able to attend or for those who may have enjoyed an extra day of sunshine in Orlando!

Monday & Tuesday

The event began with an exciting opening keynote in the morning, highlighted by Microsoft CEO, Satya Nadella. He was a delight to hear speak, and continues to drive his message about the mobile-first, cloud-first world. Being a company that builds a cloud-based product that allows mobile engagement, that sounds great to me. Microsoft took advantage of the captive audience to showcase a few really compelling new technologies that look amazing – Gigjam and Hololens leading that group. The Windows 10 demo was truly enjoyable and the product is looking good. The demo was performed by Microsoft’s Executive Demo Lead, Bryan Roper who has a pretty cool story. If you’re interested in piano bar music you’ll want to enjoy this quick read.

Though Dynamics was mostly ignored in the keynote I left looking forward to the rest of the event.

The rest of Monday and Tuesday was devoted to sessions and the expo hall. There were Dynamics focused sessions each day, where I found content that certainly made it worthwhile to attend.

Wednesday

Wednesday started with a closing keynote where we heard about the evolving partner ecosystem from many different Microsoft executives. Much of this was similar to the last several years – focused heavily on partners adding IP and other annuity-based revenue streams. It also was heavily focused on adding cloud-services for many of the partners. Again, these are the things Microsoft is really focused on, so this messaging was not a surprise. One thing that stuck out to me in the closing keynote was a comment made by one of the Executives that Dynamics is shifting to the center of the Microsoft ecosystem. This was an exciting message as a Dynamics ISV, so we will see where that goes.

The closing keynote was strong with Kevin Turner echoing the comments of Satya earlier in the week, but giving even more detail. He was very clear in his messaging that Microsoft has the best cloud services, the best products, and the best partner channel. He also mentioned that they’re excited about the competition and the fact that “Microsoft is back”. He received some strong applause when explaining his thoughts on recent partnerships with historically Microsoft-haters such as Salesforce.com and Oracle. He was very clear that Microsoft is still committed to winning in the competition, but feels the need to have these strategic partnerships to continue to build the best cloud platform in the world.

All in all, while Dynamics is not a strong focus of WPC, there was great value in the event for me and our business this year. I was able to learn a few things, grab some fun SWAG, meet with many of our partners and have really great conversations that will help to move our business forward. Add the two days of Disney World at the end of the conference with my family and what more could you ask for from a conference?

Again, it was great engaging with new and current partners! If you aren’t yet a Partner of CRM Vertex we invite you to join us. Learn more about our Partner program here.

CRM Vertex

Microsoft Dynamics ISV

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

CRM Software Blog