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Another Cambridge Analytica is out there, and we aren’t ready to fight it

 Another Cambridge Analytica is out there, and we aren’t ready to fight it

Facebook got a lot of criticism over the Cambridge Analytica breach, and Zuckerberg vowed to do better in protecting users’ privacy in a full-page ad. But this is not the first time political campaigns have used social media user data during elections — the only difference was that millions of users did not even know the platform was harvesting their data and using it to target them for political purposes.

The bigger problem is that what happened to Facebook was inevitable. Sure, Facebook as a closed system is especially harmful. A system that can see your current interactions, has control over the content it shows you, and can measure the results of those things is a perfect fit for human behavior optimization.

What I’m saying is that even if we did not have the Cambridge Analytica scandal, the fact would remain that social channels are harvesting our data. Take Twitter, for instance. You can easily see any likes and interactions people have had — that data is open to everyone. Use the Twitter API and you can automate its collection. Connect it to IBM Watson or some other enterprise service and you will instantly get access to thousands (if not millions) of records. And this data is not private by any means.

The ingenious idea is to build a psychological profile based on the “likes” of users, then learn who to target and how to target them. Once you have built this profile, you can use it any way you please.

The cycle does not need to be rooted in Facebook — one could build a profile from Twitter data and use that in Facebook ads. You only need the profile to train the AI, and once you’ve trained it, the technology can work its magic on any platform.

AI is getting more aggressive

As AI grows more intelligent, it will be able to read and analyze data from disparate sources. It will not need a feed of uniform data or dozens of operators to scan and extract the signal from the noise. For instance, there are AI technologies that can scan thousands of records in a matter of minutes and return results. This means that AI can scan websites, files, and documents and form a complete profile for us without breaking a single privacy law.

The information is out there, free for the public — it only becomes gold when a machine learning engine traverses all of them, collects the data in a single place, creates a profile based on it, and fills the gaps accordingly — all within minutes.

Many users felt manipulated by Facebook following the Cambridge Analytica scandal. This has led us to start questioning the ways the company acquired the data they used. However, soon companies like CA will have that data anyway, even without Facebook. We cannot even be sure that right this moment, the same thing is not happening again. Moreover, as I described above, companies can collect this information via completely legal means.

The problem is not Facebook. The problem is that we are not prepared for the threats that surround us.

The real threat

AI is most feared for its potential to either replace humans at work or annihilate them altogether. However, AI can’t really get creative — it can only repeat what humans do, though sometimes more efficiently. While it surely does a better job than many people in certain fields, leading to replacement worries, AI also creates new opportunities. Besides, automation attempts at major companies such as Tesla have proved that overdoing AI optimization is not practical — at least not yet.

The threat of AI taking our jobs or attacking humans isn’t as imminent as the threat of humans using the technology for nefarious purposes. It’s how we use AI that causes the real threat. For example, companies like Netflix and Facebook can use our psychological profiles to help us find new friends with similar interests or offer tailored recommendations for TV shows without issue. However, in the case of Cambridge Analytica, the company used these profiles to elicit a certain behavior from the targets without their knowledge, which is setting off alarms for good reason.

A more severe possibility for the technology involves companies using your content and connections to shift your ideas. For instance, if you publish content that contains ideas that the system wants to dissuade you from, it could share it only with people with opposite views, creating tons of negative reviews and the impression that nobody agrees with you. Likewise, if your piece contains issues the system wants you to hold onto or strengthen, it can share it only with like-minded people so you only receive positive feedback.

Taking this a step further, governments could potentially use this technology against their people. For instance, China’s censorship effectively creates a closed system that is totally vulnerable to these kinds of manipulations. Even security agencies like those revealed by Edward Snowden could control your traffic at the router level.

How to protect ourselves

AI will not go away. Our information is out there, and we cannot solely rely on regulations to protect us. Savvy individuals outpace regulations by constantly creating new ways to alter our behavior. You might take the blockchain route to conceal and stamp everything, but since not everyone is 100 percent on the blockchain, there will still be data leaks. This is why I believe in Alan Turing’s approach that only a machine can defeat another machine; thus, we need to arm and catch up with our own AI tools.

An AI assistant that protects the interests of its user could be a feasible solution. This AI would need to be transparent and decentralized so we could be certain it wouldn’t serve any other parties behind the scenes. Such AI could “break the loop.” For instance, it could detect patterns of behavior optimization and understand what a publication is trying to make you do, and warn against that. The technology could even alter the content or block parts of it to neutralize such attempts. In the case of channeled traffic, an AI assistant could be helpful by detecting such patterns and automatically sharing the content beyond a single platform, all while sending the results back to the user.

Much of what we thought about AI hasn’t happened, and a lot of things we did not think would happen have. In the end, what we are really up against is the humans behind the machines, rather than the machines themselves.

David Petersson is a developer and tech writer who contributes to Hacker Noon.

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Is There Such A Thing As Over-Innovating?

277357 l srgb s gl 300x200 Is There Such A Thing As Over Innovating?“Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” – Steve Jobs

As a part of the last wave of Millennials joining the workforce, I have been inspired by Jobs’ definition of innovation. For years, Millennials like me have been told that we need to be faster, better, and smarter than our peers. With this thought in mind and the endless possibilities of the Internet, it’s easy to see that the digital economy is here, and it is defining my generation.

Lately we’ve all read articles proclaiming that “the digital economy and the economy are becoming one in the same. The lines are being blurred.” While this may be true, Millennials do not see this distinction. To us, it’s just the economy. Everything we do happens in the abstract digital economy – we shop digitally, get our news digitally, communicate digitally, and we take pictures digitally. In fact, the things that we don’t do digitally are few and far between.

Millennial disruption: How to get our attention in the digital economy

In this fast-moving, highly technical era, innovation and technology are ubiquitous, forcing companies to deliver immediate value to consumers. This principle is ingrained in us – it’s stark reality. One day, a brand is a world leader, promising incredible change. Then just a few weeks later, it disappears. Millennials view leaders of the emerging (digital) economy as scrappy, agile, and comfortable making decisions that disrupt the norm, and that may or may not pan out.

What does it take to earn the attention of Millennials? Here are three things you should consider:

1. Millennials appreciate innovations that reinvent product delivery and service to make life better and simpler.

Uber, Vimeo, ASOS, and Apple are some of the most successful disruptors in the current digital economy. Why? They took an already mature market and used technology to make valuable connections with their Millennial customers. These companies did not invent a new product – they reinvented the way business is done within the economy. They knew what their consumers wanted before they realized it.

Millennials thrive on these companies. In fact, we seek them out and expect them to create rapid, digital changes to our daily lives. We want to use the products they developed. We adapt quickly to the changes powered by their new ideas or technologies. With that being said, it’s not astonishing that Millennials feel the need to connect regularly and digitally.

2. It’s not technology that captures us – it’s the simplicity that technology enables.

Recently, McKinsey & Company revealed that “CEOs expect 15%–50% of their companies’ future earnings to come from disruptive technology.” Considering this statistic, it may come as a surprise to these executives that buzzwords – including cloud, diversity, innovation, the Internet of Things, and future of work – does not resonate with us. Sure, we were raised on these terms, but it’s such a part of our culture that we do not think about it. We expect companies to deeply embed this technology now.

What we really crave is technology-enabled simplicity in every aspect of our lives. If something is too complicated to navigate, most of us stop using the product. And why not? It does not add value if we cannot use it immediately.

Many experts claim that this is unique to Millennials, but it truly isn’t. It might just be more obvious and prevalent with us. Some might translate our never-ending desire for simplicity into laziness. Yet striving to make daily activities simpler with the use of technology has been seen throughout history. Millennials just happen to be the first generation to be completely reliant on technology, simplicity, and digitally powered “personal” connections.

3. Millennials keep an eye on where and how the next technology revolution will begin.

Within the next few years Millennials will be the largest generation in the workforce. As a result, the onslaught of coverage on the evolution of technology will most likely be phased out. While the history of technology is significant for our predecessors, this not an overly important story for Millennials because we have not seen the technology evolution ourselves. For us, the digital revolution is a fact of life.

Companies like SAP, Amazon, and Apple did not invent the wheel. Rather, they were able to create a new digital future. For a company to be successful, senior leaders must demonstrate a talent for R&D genius as well as fortune-telling. They need to develop easy-to-use, brilliantly designed products, market them effectively to the masses, and maintain their product elite. It’s not easy, but the companies that upend an entire industry are successfully balancing these tasks.

Disruption can happen anywhere and at any time. Get ready!

Across every industry, big players are threatened — not only by well-known competitors, but by small teams sitting in a garage drafting new ideas that could turn the market upside down. In reality, anyone, anywhere, at any time can cause disruption and bring an idea to life.

Take my employer SAP, for example. With the creation of SAP S/4HANA, we are disrupting the tech market as we help our customers engage in digital transformation. By removing data warehousing and enabling real-time operations, companies are reimagining their future. Organizations such as La Trobe University, the NFL, and Adidas have made it easy to understand and conceptualize the effects using data in real time. But only time will tell whether Millennials will ever realize how much disruption was needed to get where we are today.

Find out how SAP Services & Support you can minimize the impact of disruption and maximize the success of your business. Read SAP S/4HANA customer success stories, visit the SAP Services HUB, or visit the customer testimonial page on SAP.com.

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Is there a Bond Graph toolbox or Package?

 Is there a Bond Graph toolbox or Package?

It seems like there was one, but it doesn’t exist anymore

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“There Needs To Be Real Consequences”

zuckerberg54321 “There Needs To Be Real Consequences”

I was critical last month of a line in a Nick Bilton article I otherwise liked. The Vanity Fair “Hive” writer offered this assessment of Mark Zuckerberg: “His skills and experience have put him in a rare position to remedy so much of what ails us.” I don’t think that’s so, and even if it were, the Facebook co-founder, multi-billionaire and perhaps Presidential aspirant wouldn’t likely be suited for the role. Despite his stated goal to divest himself of nearly his entire fortune to causes bettering humanity, Zuck has been from the start a morally dubious person who knowingly rose to prominence on the back of a company dedicated to mass surveillance, surreptitious “social experiments” and profiting from neo-Nazi social networking. The dishonest narrative about Facebook being a means of improving the world makes the reality worse. The company has always been about the accumulation of money and power.

It’s not that there’s no hope for Zuckerberg. There have been few bigger assholes than Bill Gates during his Microsoft heyday, and now the sweater-clad 2.0 version is actually eradicating diseases. (Truth be told, however, several people I’ve met who work for the Gates Foundation still don’t have great things to say about him as a boss.) But the social network CEO’s nation-wide “listening tour” and photo-ops in cow pastures and on shrimp boats aren’t convincing evidence he’s learned from mistakes, nor was his recent “Building Global Community” manifesto, which essentially just promised more of the same. Like many Facebook users, Zuckerberg seems to be presenting an image of what he’d like people to see rather than what’s really there. 

In the two excerpts below, Bilton takes a more skeptical look at Facebook in wake of this week’s anti-Semitic advertising scandal, and Matt Haig of the Guardianargues that social media is an unhappiness-making machine.

______________________________

From Bilton:

Since the election (and even leading up to it), it’s become abundantly clear that social media presented itself as a profoundly useful tool for the Russians, extremists, and possiblyeven people within the Trump campaign, to potentially disfigure our electoral process. Before Trump co-opted the term “fake news” to describe entirely accurate, if unfavorable, stories about him, real fake news was being created and proliferated at scale. Algorithms on Facebook didn’t work to try to stop this from happening, but rather to ensure that these fake stories landed right on the digital doorsteps of the people who might find them most interesting, and who might change their votes as a result of that content. Twitter’s problem with political bots has existed for as long as I can remember. Earlier this year,a data researcher noticedthat there were hundreds of Twitter accounts ending with a string of eight numbers (like @DavidJo52951945) that only tweeted about hot-button political topics, all of which followed each other. This might seem harmless on some level, but these accounts had been disseminating incredibly divisive (and oftentimes fake) stories about Brexit, Ukraine, and Syria, plus anti-immigration articles from outlets like Breitbart and excessively schismatic articles from the Daily Mail. The researcher also found that these accounts only tweetedbetween 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Moscow time, and only during the week—almost as if it were someone’s job in Russia to do so. The accounts have tens of thousands of followers, and the suspected propagandists behind themstoked the flames of dissentby creating far-left bots which would go after Trump and his supporters.

I don’t actually see these issues as massive problems within themselves. Of course people are going to try to manipulate these technologies. The larger issue, however, is that these enormous, profoundly wealthy companies aren’t doing enough to stop them, and are not being held accountable. (Twitter andFacebookhave attempted to crackdown on trolls in some ways since the election.) Curiously, Wall Street, which still remains oddly buoyant in the Trump era (it’s amazing what the rich will sacrifice for tax reform) is not chastising Silicon Valley for the extensive role it played in the mess we find ourselves in today. Facebook is worth $ 491 billion, despite months’ worth of news stories indicating it allowed Russian accounts to buy and target pages and adson its network during the election, which estimates say could have reached 70 million Americans. Twitter’s stock, while bumpy, has barely moved since news definitively broke about all of the“fake Americans”that Russia created and operated on the social network during the election. (Here’s a fun game: go look at Donald Trump’s latest followers on Twitter and see how long it takes you to find a real human being who has recently joined and followed him. Most accounts have names like @N4wapWLVHmeYKAq and @Aiana37481266.)

Earlier this week, Sam Biddle argued on The Intercept that Mark Zuckerberg should be forced to go before Congress about the role Facebook played in Russia’s propaganda efforts. “Zuckerberg should publicly testify under oath before Congress on his company’s capabilities to influence the political process, be it Russian meddling or anything else,” Biddle wrote. “If the company is as powerful as it promises advertisers, it should be held accountable.” There are also reports that there is now a “red-hot” focus on social media by special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the 2016 election. But in both of these instances, there needs to be real consequences. It doesn’t take 20,000 employees to see the apathy and neglect these platforms have played, and continue to play, in the attacks against democracy by the people who want to see it fall.•

______________________________

From Haig:

Even the internet activist and former Google employee Wael Ghonim – one of the initiators of the Arab spring and one-time poster boy for internet-inspired revolution – who once saw social media as a social cure – now saw it as a negative force. In his eyes it went from being a place for crowdsourcing and sharing, during the initial wave of demonstrations against the Egyptian regime, to a fractious battleground full of “echo chambers” and “hate speech”: “The same tool that united us to topple dictators eventually tore us apart.” Ghonim saw social media polarising people into angry opposing camps – army supporters and Islamists – leaving centrists such as himself stuck in the middle, powerless.

And this isn’t just politics. It’s health too. A survey conducted by the Royal Society of Public Health asked 1,500 young people to keep track of their moods while on the five most popular social media sites. Instagram and Snapchat came out worst, often inspiring feelings of inadequacy, anxiety and self-loathing. And according to another survey carried out by the youth charity Plan International UK, half of girls and two-fifths of boys have been the victims of online bullying.

The evidence is growing that social media can be a health risk, particularly for young people who now have all the normal pressures of youth (fitting in, looking good, being popular) being exploited by the multibillion-dollar companies that own the platforms they spend much of their lives on.

Kurt Vonnegut said: “We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful who we pretend to be.” This seems especially true now we have reached a new stage of marketing where we are not just consumers, but also the thing consumed.•

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There and Back Again: Embedded Data Analytics

rsz bigstock oil pump on the oil field in t 166703837 There and Back Again: Embedded Data Analytics

IDS has been providing operational reporting solutions to the upstream oil and gas industry for more than twenty years. In that time, we have helped more than 120 companies across the globe to capture, analyze, and report on their operational data. We have reported on more than 150,000 operations on nearly 500 rigs.

Our solutions are completely web-based and fully customized to meet the unique requirements of each company’s operating environment. Providing a wide scope of capabilities including daily drilling, completions, geology reporting, cost analysis, rig monitoring and operational planning, we create value by allowing companies to understand their key performance indicators in order to make better decisions.

Seven years ago, we embarked upon the challenging journey into data visualization and analytics. We set up a small agile team with the task of building dashboards, bespoke reports, and the ability to interact with data stored on our servers. This project was designed on our previous technology stack, which rendered our visualizations in flash. Shortly after Steve Jobs entitled his open letter “Thoughts on Flash”, it was time for us to shift technology…

After a lengthy investigation into embeddable reporting, visualization, and data interrogation technologies, we selected TIBCO Jaspersoft. Harnessing the multi-tenancy and embeddability of Jaspersoft, we could very quickly deliver pixel-perfect reports and dashboards to our end users. Additionally, by using JasperReports, we reduced the report generation time from an average of 83 seconds in our legacy system to 8 seconds. We are now in the process of recreating more than 1,000 reports in Jaspersoft Studio, thus not only providing our clients with faster information, but also with reports that look aesthetically pleasing. To date, we have discovered that it takes a similar amount of time to create reports and dashboards (in comparison to our legacy system), however we are continually optimizing this process and the team is learning new things every day.

Furthering the use of Jaspersoft Studio, we have created many Custom Visualisation Components (CVC) that are commonly used within oil and gas. Wellbore schematics, safety pyramids, histograms, and parallel coordinates have been developed by our team and released through JasperReports Server whereby our customers can run our custom-built visualizations on their data.

Over the past three years, the oil and gas industry has seen the biggest downturn to date with more than 440,000 jobs lost worldwide at the end of 2016. As the industry begins to adapt to the ‘lower for longer’ mentality, many oil companies are looking at digital technology for answers. With less people to perform day-to-day tasks, operators are looking to automate manual work by using technology efficiently (typically moving from MS Excel to Web-Delivered Data management). To that end, Jaspersoft applications have become invaluable in our capability suite, allowing us agility in content creation, data manipulation, and speed of deployment.

The customer need for digitization coupled with our capabilities in reporting, data modelling, analytics, visualization, and data science creates a substantial platform for future growth and development.

To learn more about IDS and its operational reporting solutions for upstream oil and gas, we invite you to join TIBCO’s webinar with Colin on July 11th, 2017. Register now.

And for more information, contact Colin directly at IDS at cdawson@idsdatanet.com.

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About Krisgo

I’m a mom, that has worn many different hats in this life; from scout leader, camp craft teacher, parents group president, colorguard coach, member of the community band, stay-at-home-mom to full time worker, I’ve done it all– almost! I still love learning new things, especially creating and cooking. Most of all I love to laugh! Thanks for visiting – come back soon icon smile What’s under there?

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There is no exit. (fyi)

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About Krisgo

I’m a mom, that has worn many different hats in this life; from scout leader, camp craft teacher, parents group president, colorguard coach, member of the community band, stay-at-home-mom to full time worker, I’ve done it all– almost! I still love learning new things, especially creating and cooking. Most of all I love to laugh! Thanks for visiting – come back soon icon smile There is no exit. (fyi)

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Is there a future for humans?

Lurking beneath the fear of artificial intelligence and automation threatening people’s jobs lies a deeper, far more profound threat. Do artificial intelligence and automation imperil humanity itself?

Those predicting a dystopian future include Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Stephen Hawking, and many others. For some of them, it’s only a matter of time before the prophecy of Yuval Noah Harari’s great book, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, comes to pass. The bleak vision: a world where a small group of humans control machines, which in turn control the rest of humanity.

Meanwhile, there are others who, even while feeling blindsided by the rapid development of AI, see the potential for a bright future. “The revolution in deep nets has been very profound, it definitely surprised me, even though I was sitting right there,” said Google cofounder Sergey Brin at the World Economic Forum in January. “What can these things do? We don’t really know the limits,” he said. “It has incredible possibilities. I think it’s impossible to forecast accurately.”

And there’s plenty to be optimistic about. Already AI, automation and other digital technologies are helping realize everything from medical breakthroughs to increased economic productivity to self-driving cars. Yet for alarmists, these activities are rendering humans the metaphorical equivalents of frogs inside a pot of water on the stove, unaware that the water is getting warm.

Wading into this controversy are Stephen Wolfram, founder of Wolfram Research, and Irwin Gotlieb, chairman of GroupM. Speaking with VentureBeat editor in chief Blaise Zerega onstage at Collision in New Orleans, the pair voiced carefully reasoned, but very different, approaches to the issue in a session titled “Is there a future for humans?” (Watch video above.)

Wolfram explained that the current kerfuffle around AI is really just a continuation of the way technology helps humans by taking on tasks so that we no longer have to do them. “If there’s one thing that has advanced throughout history, it’s technology,” he said. “The question then is: What is it that humans still have to do?” In his view, we’re rapidly getting to a place where humans will be setting goals and then turning to technology to achieve them, as automatically as possible.

 Is there a future for humans?

Above: Stephen Wolfram, founder of Wolfram Research, asked, “What is it that humans still have to do?”

“When people ask what’s the space left for the humans,” Wolfram said, “the figuring out of what do is the kind of quintessential human piece.”

Gotlieb agreed with Wolfram on this principle — to a point. “I am much more fearful than Stephen,” he countered. “All of a sudden, problems that we thought we had two decades to deal with, we’re going to be facing them much, much more quickly.” He explained that the nerd in him welcomed the advances wrought by AI, but at the same time, “there’s a little voice in the back of my head that’s saying the dystopian outcome is perhaps more likely.”

 Is there a future for humans?

Above: Irwin Gotlieb, chairman of GroupM, said, “There’s a little voice in the back of my head that’s saying the dystopian outcome is perhaps more likely.”

The two discussed ways rapid technological advances were accelerating income inequality, societal changes, and job losses, as well as the need for collective action to better understand and even regulate the ways AI might be used in future. For instance, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov’s three rules of robotics have held up so far, and more recently, Wolfram has described the need for an AI Constitution.

And yet when the conversation took a turn towards ethics and humanity’s general quest for meaning, the importance of human judgment rose to the surface. Gotlieb raised the scenario of one AI-car carrying one passenger and another carrying several passengers; if only one vehicle could be saved, how would an AI system determine a response?

“At the moment there isn’t one solution for the world, and different parties will put different rule sets against it, with different objectives,” Gotlieb said.

“This question of ‘Can we invent one perfect set of mathematical principles that will determine the AIs for all eternity?’ — the answer, I think, is no,” Wolfram said. “In the longer future, we’re being asked to look at ourselves and ask: What is the essence of humanity? If we could define an AI Constitution, what would we want it to say?”

On this they agreed: The future for humans is up to, well, us humans.

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Are we there yet? Repeal & Replace Trump: high crimes and misdemeanors

 Are we there yet? Repeal & Replace Trump: high crimes and misdemeanors

 Are we there yet? Repeal & Replace Trump: high crimes and misdemeanors

 Isn’t it time for him to go…

The charge of high crimes and misdemeanors covers allegations of misconduct peculiar to officials, such as perjury of oath, abuse of authority, bribery, intimidation, misuse of assets, failure to supervise, dereliction of duty, conduct unbecoming, and refusal to obey a lawful order.

 Are we there yet? Repeal & Replace Trump: high crimes and misdemeanors

Some people are reflexively opposed to making such a strong statement so early in the administration. But Trump is already committing impeachable offenses, and dealing with someone like this requires being well prepared to take advantage of any openings to stop him. It is certainly what the Republicans would do if the shoe were on the other foot. In fact, it is exactly what they were planning to do. 

www.alternet.org/…

 Are we there yet? Repeal & Replace Trump: high crimes and misdemeanors

The inquiry should keep a running dossier, and forward updates at least weekly to the House Judiciary Committee. There will be no lack of evidence.

The materials should be made public via a website. The inquiry should be conducted by a distinguished panel whose high-mindedness and credentials are, well, unimpeachable.

There needs to be a parallel public campaign, pressing for an official investigation. For those appalled by Trump, who wonder where to focus their efforts, here is something concrete―and more realistic than it may seem.

Trump has already committed grave misdeeds of the kind that the Constitutional founders described as high crimes and misdemeanors. With his commingling of his official duties and his personal enrichment, Trump will be in violation of the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution, which unambiguously prohibits any person holding public office from profiting from gifts or financial benefits from “any king, prince or Foreign state.”

Trump, who has entangled his business interests with his political connections at home and abroad, has already declared his contempt for these Constitutional protections. He declared“The law is totally on my side, meaning the president can’t have a conflict of interest.” Oh, yes he can, and this president will. 

In his dalliance with Vladimir Putin, Trump’s actions are skirting treason. John Shattuck, former Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights and former Washington legal director of the ACLU has pointed to the constitutional definition of treasona crime committed by a person “owing allegiance to the United States who… adheres to their enemies, giving them aid or comfort.” By undermining further investigation or sanctions against the Russian manipulation of the 2016 election, Trump as president would be giving aid and comfort to Russian interference with American democracy.

 Are we there yet? Repeal & Replace Trump: high crimes and misdemeanors If you agree this man should not be leading our free nation, stand with us!

By signing this petition you are requesting the immediate impeachment of Donald Trump, removing all opportunity for his control of the executive branch of our government.
www.change.org/…

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About Krisgo

I’m a mom, that has worn many different hats in this life; from scout leader, camp craft teacher, parents group president, colorguard coach, member of the community band, stay-at-home-mom to full time worker, I’ve done it all– almost! I still love learning new things, especially creating and cooking. Most of all I love to laugh! Thanks for visiting – come back soon icon smile Almost there

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